Game | Conversation Skills Giving your opinion | Conversatio

Game (0.20 seconds)

Get email alerts with the latest game trailers for Game | Conversation Skills Giving your opinion | Conversatio
You can cancel email alerts at anytime.

Conversation Skills Giving your opinion

From Youtube.com - Posted: Oct 20, 2013 - 391,075 viewsGame | Conversation Skills Giving your opinion | Conversation Skills Giving your opinion
Conversation Skills Giving your opinion
Conversation Skills Giving your opinion
Trailer Duration: 11 minutes 25 seconds 
Play Now
(Source: youtube.com).
www.engvid.com/ If someone asks you your opinion, don't say "so-so", or maybe. Tell the person how you feel. In this lesson, learn how to give your opinion! Don't be shy! www.engvid.com/conversation-skills-giving-your-opinion/TRANSCRIPTHello. Welcome to the lesson of giving your opinion. My name is Ronnie. Do me a favor. Go to YouTube. Go to my page, EnglishLessons4U, and subscribe to my channel. Watch out for imitators. I'm the real deal. Be careful. I'm going to teach you guys how to give your opinion. Now, you might think, "Ronnie, I already know how to give my opinion." If someone says, "Hey, do you like pizza?" And I say, "It's so-so." Your opinion is "so-so"? Guess what, that's a really bad answer. So I want to teach you some techniques to continue a conversation when you have to give your opinion. This happens all the time. Maybe you went to a new restaurant or you saw a movie or you went to a new pub or bar or restaurant and you want to tell people, "Oh, my god, it was great! I went to the new restaurant that opened up." And your friend says, "How was it?" And you say, "Okay." What kind of answer is "okay"? Was it good? Was it bad? Did you get diarrhea? Did you like it? What did you eat? So when someone asks you your opinion, instead of giving short, one-word answers -- "Yes." "I liked it." "It was great." -- you need to expand, and you need to give more information. Here is a list of things that you should not say when someone asks your opinion. -"So? How was the movie?" -"So-so." What the hell does "so-so" mean? "So" means "yes" and "no" at the same time? If someone said to me, "It's so-so", I think it's bad. Don't say that. Maybe your friend and you saw the same movie, and someone asks your friend, "Hey, how was the movie?" Your friend said, "Well, it was a little boring, and there wasn't a lot of action. I didn't really like it that much." The conversation naturally would go to you, and you'd go, "Same." Same what? Please don't do this. It's so frustrating when you're trying to have a conversation with someone. Don't say "same". You are an individual. Please give the person your opinion. You can say something like, "Well, I agree. It was boring, but..." -- add your own spice of life; add your own opinion. So instead of saying "same", you can say, "I agree", and then add your information. The next one. Now, if you're a little shy, and someone offers you something, for example, "Would you like to have free English lessons?" "Sure" is a good answer. But if you're giving your opinion, for example, "Did you like the new restaurant that you went to last night?" "Sure." "Sure" is a really, really bad answer. What, again, you want to do is expand in your answer. This is the worst thing you can say if someone asks you your opinion or if they ask you a question about something. As an example, someone might say, -"Ronnie, are you from Canada?" -"Of course." "Well, excuse me for asking." You only are going to use "of course" if someone has asked you a very, very stupid question or a question that they already know the answer to. As an example, you could say, "Ronnie, you're from Canada. Do you have red hair?" And I'd say, "Of course I do. You can see it." So when you answer "of course", it does not mean the same as "yes". "Of course" is a very, very rude way to answer someone's question if they ask you something. So please be very careful of this. "Are you enjoying your English lessons?" "Of course!" Good answer. "Maybe." "Do you like Ronnie, teacher?" "Maybe." Maybe? What does "maybe" mean? So "maybe", "sure ", "same", "so-so" -- garbage. Don't use them. "Maybe" -- are you not going to tell me the answer? Is it a secret? Don't say "maybe". Another one that a lot of you guys say is unnecessary unless you want to exaggerate something. So let's say, again, that you went to a new pizza shop, and you ordered some really spicy pasta -- at a pizza store. That's okay. So you get the pizza or the pasta; it's really spicy, and you eat it, and your friend goes, "Hey how's your spicy pasta?" You're going to say, "It's spicy." You do not need to say, "It's spicy for me" because you are the one talking. So you can just say, "It's spicy." Now, the way that we would use this correctly is to exaggerate something. Example: If you're having pasta that's really, really spicy, and your friend is having the same pasta dish, maybe your friend is eating it and goes, "This is not spicy for me." You're exaggerating that one is spicy and one isn't. So you're eating it; you're dying; you're crying; your face is turning red; you say, "God, this is spicy." Your friend's, like, "This isn't spicy for me." So you're exaggerating your point. Be careful about this one.So these ones: Don't use them. This one: Only if you're exaggerating a point. These -- are the good ones. These are the good guys. These ones don't exist anymore.

Like to get lastest games everyday!
Related Games:

How to write a basic paragraph

http:www.engvid.com A writing lesson for absolute beginners! Here are four very basic rules you must follow when writing simple paragraphs. Learn the basics -- capitals, indentation, line spacing, and more. Then take the quiz: http:www.engvid.comhow-to-write-a-basic-paragraphTRANSCRIPTHello. Do you know how to write a basic paragraph? This is not only for ESL students. This is for everyone around the world, even if you speak English, even if you don't speak English. This is a very, very beautiful, basic lesson on how to write small, short, beautiful paragraphs. "How to Write a Basic Paragraph". Now, I also want you to be very careful. This is not how to write a 200-word essay for your university exam. We don't have enough time in the world for me to teach you that, and I probably forget. So this is, very simply, how to write a basic English paragraph. One, two, three, four rules. Rule No. 1 is: Indent, indent. What does "indent" mean? Indent, basically, means -- I learned this when I was a child -- you take your finger. You can have a big finger, a small finger -- I don't care. You take your finger or two fingers, and you make a little space like so. This is called an "indentation" or "indent". So "indent" means you leave a space at the very first line of the paragraph. And that's it. You do not leave a space at any other lines in the paragraph, only the first line. So it's very important that you only indent the first line of your paragraph like so. Okay. The next thing that you have to do is you have to use a capital letter at the beginning of every sentence. Now, the word that I've written is "I". Another rule in English is that every single time you write "I", it must be a capital. So I'm going to write an example sentence for you to illustrate what I mean: "I am a teacher." Okay? This is one sentence. So rule No. 3: At the end of my sentence, I must use a period. A "period" is a dot, if you'd like. So "I am a teacher." So what I'm going to do is my next sentence... I'm going to begin it with a capital letter. "My" -- so I want to say, "My name -- My name is Ronnie." So what I've done: Rule No. 1, indent. Rule No. 2, you have to use a capital letter at the beginning of every new sentence. Rule No. 3, you're going to use a period at the end of each sentence so that the person reading your beautiful paragraph knows when to stop and take a break. For example, if I did not have a period here, I'd say, "I'm a teacher my name is Ronnie." You need to break up your ideas. So one sentence has one thought and one period. "I am a teacher. My name is Ronnie." Next one. No. 4. I see this in a lot of students' writing. The two basic things about a paragraph are the form and the content. The form is the most important. The form is the indentation. And don't use point form. Do you know what "point form" is? If you're typing something on Word or on an email, "point form" is also called "bullets", which [makes shooting sounds]. So "bullet" means you would put each new sentence on a new line. So if I was to write this: "I'm a teacher", then I would put my next sentence here. This is not how to make a paragraph. This is "point form". So this is a bad paragraph. What I'm going to do is I'm going to write until I almost reach the end of the page. Don't write past the end of the page because then you're writing on the desk and it gets messy. So "I am a teacher. My name is Ronnie. I live -- so I'm going to use up all of my line until the end -- I live in Canada." What would you like to know about Canada? "Canada is very cold." In the winter. So as you can see by my example, I only stop my sentence at the end of my paper. I don't use each sentence on each line. So four basic things to remember when you're writing a basic English paragraph. The first one is: Indent the first line of your paragraph only. Use a capital letter at the beginning of each new line or each new sentence. And use a period at the end. Also, don't forget: Don't use point form. "I am a teacher. My name is Ronnie. I live in Canada. Canada is very cold. Go to 'Subscribe' on YouTube so you can find more great lessons like this." Goodbye.
202,152 views | Oct 03, 2013
game

Conversation Skills Speak with confidence

http:www.engvid.com Don't be shy! Use your English ability to talk to anyone! If you make a mistake, don't worry... just keep talking and you'll improve your conversation skills! Watch this video now to learn how confidence will make you a better and more interesting speaker.
938,323 views | Aug 10, 2011
game

OLD SCHOOL Vocabulary...too formal!

http:www.engvid.com I exited the building = very strange English! I shall teach you = very old-fashioned English! I joined the BBQ = WHAT??? Exit, shall, and join are all old words, and are considered too formal nowadays! Learn how to use more natural words and expressions! Don't forget to take the quiz: http:www.engvid.comold-school-vocabularyTRANSCRIPTHello, and welcome to my lesson. I hope you are happy. What? What's going on? Today, I'm going to teach you some words that you will say in English. They are definitely English words. You will use the words correctly in a beautiful, grammatically correct sentence, but they make me go, "What? That's weird. That's weird. "You speak like a grandmother or a grandfather." This lesson is called "Olde School" or -- uh-oh! "Too formal! What are you doing?" So one of the goals that I've always had since I started teaching ESL, or teaching English, is that textbook English and the way that a lot of people teach you how to speak... it's not "cool". You sound like you are reading a textbook. One of my goals in life is to make everyone that I teach sound natural, normal, and not like an old person even if you are an old person. That's cool. I want you to learn words that I and other normal -- normal? Not normal -- and natural English speakers would use. So "Olde School". "Ronnie, you've spelled "old school" wrong." Guess what? A long time ago, this is how they spelled "old", but they didn't say "oldie", they said "old". "Olde school" "Olde school" means it's old. So let's look at the first one: "Telephone". We never, ever, ever, ever, ever say "telephone"; we say "phone" or "mobile" or "cell". "Telephone" is really, really, really old. Do you remember the really old telephones that you had to dial -- you stick your finger and you go [makes clicking sounds]? And if you made a mistake, you had to start again. I remember being a little Ronnie, and I had to dial my best friend's number, and it had three nines in it. [Shudders] "I made a mistake." So "telephone" -- old. Now we have these wonderful cell phones. You press a button, and your friend is right there -- "Hi", okay? Don't use the word "telephone"; it's strange. The other one is: "Television". Do you have a television? I don't. I hate television. So much so that I don't even call it that; I call it a TV. Please call it a "TV", not a "television". "Television" is old, very old. This word: "refrigerator" -- "Ronnie, there's a space here." Yeah. Ronnie has trouble spelling. And the reason why I have trouble spelling this word is we never, ever, ever say this word: "refrigerator". I'm tired by the time I get to this space here, so instead of saying "refrigerator", do you know what we say? "I'm hungry. I'm going to go to the fridge." and get a Coke or a drink. So normally, we shorten this, and we call it a "fridge", "fridge". "Automobile", "auto". If you speak any of the Latin languages, you can understand "auto" means "self"; "mobile" means "move". "Look at me. I'm going in my self-move to the -- to the mall. Would you like a drive?" "No. I'll take the bus, thank you." So "automobile" and "auto", we do not use. We call it one of these [makes car noise] a "car". I have seen a textbook -- one or two in my day -- and it actually says "automobile". So I looked at the date: "Published 2010." Really? You put "automobile" in a textbook? Give your head a shake. The next one is a modal verb. If you do not know what a modal verb is, go look in a grammar book. "Shall" is a modal verb. However, we never use this. The only time you will see this modal verb used is if you are reading rules of something. If you go to a public swimming pool, or if you go on the subway, all of the rules are written with this word. "You shall not spit in the pool. You shall not -- in the pool." Okay, I'm not going to do that. "You shall not run around the pool because you're going to die." "Shall" -- we always use "will" or negative "won't". This has... replaced our modal verb "shall". Please don't say this; it's weird. "You shall give me a dollar." What? "You will give me a dollar." "You're going to give me a dollar." Everyone give me a dollar. The next one is an expression: "What a pity" or "What a shame!" Now, if you were -- let's see -- maybe a 70-year-old grandmother or grandfather living in England, you would say this all the time. My grandmother -- God rest her soul -- would say this, "What a pity. What a shame." She's from Scotland. She says this all the time, "What a pity. What a shame." We go, "That sucks." Okay? If something is bad, you can -- you can say that. You can say, "Wow. That sucks." or "That blows." Don't say this. You can even say, "That's bad." "What a pity" or "What a shame" -- it's way, way too old. Too old. Too old. Bye-bye. "Pardon me!" Pardon me; I forgot the "S". "Pardon me" -- again, my grandmother says this all the time. Pardon me -- we say now: "Excuse me."
227,303 views | Sep 19, 2013
game

How to understand native speakers questions in English

http:www.engvid.com Native English speakers ask questions SO fast that you can't understand them! Watch this lesson to improve your listening comprehension in English. You'll be able to answer questions like "watayadoin?!"
1,284,572 views | Feb 24, 2012
game

English Conversation Learn English Speaking English Course English Sub...

Like us on Facebook: https:www.fb.comLearnEnglishConversation Easy and Fun ways to Learn English: http:isharequote.comLearn English Conversation is a free Channel for English learners. You will find free English vocabulary Videos, English grammar Videos, English exercises and English lessons. Thousands of English Videos are waiting for you. They will help you learn English.Please subscribe to update new videos. Subscribe To Update New Lesson: https:www.youtube.comVideoLearnEnglish Like us on Facebook: https:www.facebook.comLearnEnglishConversation
1,237,465 views | Sep 10, 2013
game

When NOT to use to in English Grammar

http:www.engvid.com "I'm going to home" or I'm going to home"? "I'm going to school" or "I'm going to school?" Why do we use 'to' with some words and not with others? In this English grammar class, I'll teach you many words that don't go with 'to'. This is a mistake that sounds bad to native speakers, so try to learn these words and stop making this mistake! Go here to take a quiz on this lesson: http:www.engvid.comwhen-not-to-use-toTRANSCRIPT"Are you going to home?" "Are you going home?" "Where are you going?" "What are you doing?" You're watching a video. My name's Ronnie. I'm going to teach you one trick. Finally, you will understand why in English, we say "I'm going to school" or "I'm going to work." But when we talk about our beautiful, warm, and cozy home we don't say "to". Why, why, why, I don't know. It's just English, isn't it? I can give you some clues. I'll give you some words. You will get this right away. It will be easy for you to do. So if you look at this sentence, "Are you going home?" A very, very big mistake that everyone says will be, "Are you going to home?" And I go, "No, no 'to'. Don't say 'to'. Don't say 'to', no!" Okay, okay, okay, "Are you going home?" Yes, don't say "to", but why? You learned that when you are going someplace, you say "to". For example, "Are you going to bed?" We don't say "to the bed", by the way. We just say bed. "Are you going to bed?" "Are you going to work?" Or you can use the past tense, "Did you go to work?" "Did you go to school?" "Did you go to engvid.com today, and check out a new lesson?" But when you say "home", you do not use "to". So you know the rule, maybe that this is a noun. This is a noun, so when you use going to a place which is a noun, you have to say "to", and then you come along, and you find this beautiful home, and Ronnie freaks out, because you say "to" and then you don't understand why. I don't know but I will give you a list of words that are places. But all of these words on this board, you cannot use with "to". So "are you going abroad?" You cannot ask someone, "Are you going to abroad?" If you look in the dictionary; the dictionary, one of those books. If you look at an online dictionary it'll tell you that these are adverbs of location, whereas the other ones you've learned are nouns. But hold on, "home" is a noun. Home is just this big exception going, "No, I am a noun. I don't want to have "to". All of these ones are not proper nouns, they're adverbs of location. Let's go through underground, underneath the surface of the land. If you have ever been to London, there's a big system called the Tube. It's also called the "underground". Most places in the world call it the "underground". In Canada, we call it the subway -- "sub" means "under". So you can say, "I'm going underground. I'm going underground." If you know The Jam -- "Wow, what an amazing band, Ronnie," I know. You will know this song called "I'm Going Underground." Maybe by the magic of video, we'll put on that video for you. "I'm going underground." "I'm going downtown," or you can say "uptown". I would just sing songs for everything, "Uptown Girls" -- little bit of Billy Joel for you. Uptown, downtown -- you don't need the "to". There, here, anywhere, nowhere, somewhere -- you don't need "to". In, inside, out, outside, upstairs, downstairs don't use "to". They're not nouns. They're places. One other thing to be very careful about, please, when you say this you want to say "upstairs" and "downstairs." Too many times I hear people say, "I went down-stair." Only one, just one stair, I made it. "I went up-stair." And then what did you do? You just stood there? Wow, don't say "down-stair, up-stair". Please use all of the stairs. Go up, okay? That'll be fun, more exciting. You can fall down the stairs too, that's fun. But again, we don't say "to". "I'm going downstairs." "I'm coming upstairs." If you are confused, or if you have ever been confused about when to use "to", the only advice I can give you is please remember this list of words. Once you have remembered this list, you'll go, "Oh that was easy." [That was easy.]" Yes, it was. Thank you, goodbye.
379,909 views | Jul 19, 2013
game

Conversation Skills How to avoid a conversation!

http:www.engvid.com What if you DON'T want to have a conversation? How can you STOP talking with someone annoying? What can you do to AVOID talking with people? Watch this lesson to learn the WORST social conversation skills! If you want to improve your English conversation skills, don't follow ANY of the tips in this lesson! http:www.engvid.comhow-to-avoid-a-conversationTRANSCRIPTHi. Ronnie. Video. Conversation skills. How to avoid them? So maybe you don't want to talk to someone. This lesson is called "Conversation Skills: How to avoid a conversation." "Avoid" means you want to stop having or not have something.So all of your life, probably, when you have been learning English, you've learned many lessons about how to have a conversation, how to talk to strangers, how to talk to people on the subway, how to talk to people in a store. Sometimes, I don't want to talk to anyone. Sometimes, people talk to me.As an example, every morning, when I wake up, I have to walk my dog. It's cold outside. I've not had my coffee yet. I don't want to walk my dog. I do not want to be outside. And I'm generally not wanting to do anything except go back to bed. It seems that people that have dogs love to have conversations with other people who have dogs. I don't want to talk to you. I don't care. They ask me strange questions like, "Is your dog a boy or a girl?" Why? Why do you care if my dog is a boy dog or a girl dog? Do you want to have sex with my dog? Are you concerned if my dog has a penis? No. Stop it. Who cares? "How old is your dog?" Why? Do you want to know his birthday? Are you going to have a party? Is your dog and my dog going to come to my house, and are we going to have a party? No. Shut up. I'm walking my dog. Don't talk to me.So tips on how to avoid a conversation. Rule No. 1, very easy, don't ever make eye contact with anyone you do not want to talk to. Number one rule when you want to have a conversation is you must look at the people's eyes. Don't look down. Don't look up. Look at their eyes. So to not have a conversation, don't look anyone in the eye. I'm not talking to you.The second one is: Don't ask the speaker any questions. So as an example, "Oh, hi. What kind of dog do you have?", "It's a Cairn terrier". "How old is it?", "Seven". "Is it a boy or a girl?", "Boy". If you've noticed, I did not ask the person about their dog because I don't care. If you wanted to have a conversation with someone, you could ask the person the same question. As an example, "Hi", "Hi", "Good, yeah". "What kind of dog do you have?", "It's a Cairn terrier. How about you? What kind of dog do you have?", "It's a Jack Russell". "Oh, cool. Don't care. Good". "How old is your dog?" "Seven. How about you? How old is your dog?", "four". "Great", "Is your dog a boy or a girl?" "My dog's a boy. How about you? How about your dog? Does your dog have a penis or a vagina?", "Girl". "Oh, do you know what? Maybe my dog and your dog should have a party. Maybe they could have puppies. That would be cool. Yeah. Okay. Good to see you. Bye".Next one: Look at something or someone else. Now, maybe you have the magic of a cell phone. This is a great conversation avoider. You may go as far as to pretend -- "Hi, Mom. Yeah, good. No" -- that you're talking to someone on the phone. "Mom. Yeah. Busy. No. No, I got -- Mom, hi. Yeah. Good". This is a great tool. You can pretend that your phone rang, and you're talking to your mother. You can pretend you got a text message. Or you can just look at your phone. This will indicate to the speaker that you do not want to talk to them. In reverse, if you want to talk to a person and have a real conversation, put your phone down. Do not text or talk on the phone when you are trying to have a conversation with a real live human being. If I'm at a bar and I'm talking to you, if you take out your phone and start texting someone, bye-bye. Ronnie's gone. She's getting another beer. So please, if humans want to talk to you, put your phones away. You can text them later.If you talk really, really, really fast and you don't say your words properly -- no one has any idea what you're talking about -- they will not have a conversation with you. So if you speak or talk really, really quickly, or if you mumble -- "Mumble?" "Mumble" means you do not say words clearly. Some people will talk like this. They have their hand -- they put their hand in front of their mouth, and you can't really hear anything that they're saying because[inaudible]So rule No.1, put your hand down, okay? Don't talk down. When I talk like this, you can't even hear -- okay? "Mumbling" means you don't say your words clearly, or they're muffled. It's like this.[Inaudible]And talking really, really, really quickly. Maybe you are very excited to meet someone. That's cool. But try and speak a little slowly so that the person can understand you.
163,749 views | Mar 30, 2014
game

Learn English vocabulary in the BATHROOM

http:www.engvid.com Is there a difference between a BATHROOM and a WASHROOM? Today's English lesson is all about RESTROOM vocabulary! It has many names, and I bet you visit this place many times every day. Lets make sure you can talk about it properly. Avoid making embarrassing mistakes by learning some very common words. When you're done, wash your hands and take the quiz! EngVid: Don't take a dump without it. http:www.engvid.comenglish-vocabulary-bathroomTRANSCRIPT"Teacher! Teacher! Ronnie! Ronnie! Can I go -- can I go bathroom?" "What? 'Can I go bathroom?' Okay. 'Can I go to the bathroom?' Yes. 'Can I go bathroom?' No. Not in here, please. If you said, "Can I go bathroom", that means that you are going to pee where you are. Please go to the bathroom or the washroom to pee.Today's lesson is all about going to the toilet. This thing is called a "plunger". Plunge, plunge, plunge! What do you do with this in the bathroom, you wonder? This is a plunger. What we use this for is in the toilet.So let's imagine that your friend, your mother, your father, your brother, your sister, or you ate a lot of food last night. And then, you went to the toilet. You took a massive dump. What is a "massive dump"? A "massive dump" is slang. "Take a massive dump." "Massive" means very big, and "dump" -- let me draw it for you -- means poo. Unchi! Japanese style. So "take a massive dump" means "to have a bowel movement", if you will. Okay? But it's so large that maybe it clogs or plugged the toilet. So that means I cannot flush the toilet. Now, basic bathroom etiquette. Please, when you have finished whatever you're doing in there, please always flush the toilet. There's a little mechanism on the toilet. It's usually a silver color. It's very easy. You press it. All of the water and all of the extra things in the toilet floating here -- maybe you have some poo -- it goes away so that the next person does not have to see what you ate for dinner. I don't want to see that. "Oh, Uncle John had corn last night." Unnecessary for me to see. So please, I beg of you, if you are going to use the toilet, please flush it, okay?There was a rhyme that I knew -- I still know it. It's called, "If it's yellow, let it mellow. If it's brown, flush it down." I would like to change the poem to say, "Flush the toilet. I don't care what color it is. I don't want to see it." Or you're going to be getting one of these stuck in your face. So rule No. 1: Flush the toilet, okay? With a plunger, you are going to -- as I said -- unclog the plugged toilet.What happens in a toilet or in a sink is you have a drain, okay? A "drain" is a hole at the bottom where all the water goes into. It goes to Magic Land. Okay? So the sink and the toilet both have a drain, as does your bathtub and your shower. What happens is hair or other debris gets stuck in the drain. So the drain gets clogged or plugged. It basically means that all of this stuff can't go down the pipe, and it backs up. So the water doesn't go down. Dangerous with a toilet. Not as bad with a sink. Acceptable with a bathtub and a shower. All you need to do is plunge it. Make sure it's clean.Now, what do you do in a sink? Usually, when you go to the sink, you wash your hands. Rule No. 2: After you go to the toilet, you flush the toilet, okay? Then, it's really, really cool. It's the coolest thing ever that you wash your hands. Especially for men. Guys, what are you touching? What are you doing? I don't want to touch a doorknob that you have touched after you've taken -- sorry. After you've gone to the toilet. You've touched your man part. You did not wash your hand, and then you touched the doorknob. I'm touching your knob, too, okay? Literally. I don't want to touch your knob. Please wash your hands after you flush the toilet. Good.Another thing that you might find in a bathroom or a washroom is a bathtub, andor you may have a shower. Now, the difference between a bathtub and a shower, it's very easy. When you have or take a bath, you're going to do it in the bathtub. In the bathtub, you get to lie down. You get to relax. Maybe you have some bubbles. Maybe you have a rubber ducky. That's a duck, okay? I'm an artist. That's a duck.A shower, it's very small, and you don't have enough room to lie down, so you are going to stand up in the shower, okay? It doesn't matter if you say the verb "take" or "have". So you can say, "I'm going to have a bath. I'm going to take a bath. Or I'm going to have a shower. I'm going to take a shower." The other thing that you can say is -- "shower" is also a verb. So you can say, "I'm going to shower. I'm going to shower." You can't say, "I'm going to bath, or I'm going to bathtub." Because "bathtub" and "bath" -- these guys are only nouns, okay? A shower can be a verb and a noun. English is so confusing sometimes. Even when you're just trying to be clean. I'll help you. Don't worry.
135,828 views | May 07, 2014
game

6 Confusing Words fun funny, famous popular, surprise shock

http:www.engvid.com If I go to an amusement park, it is fun or funny? Is George W. Bush famous or popular? Was the dead animal I saw a surprise or a shock? New English speakers often confuse these 3 pairs of words. Learn how they are different! http:www.engvid.com6-confusing-words
274,852 views | Mar 01, 2013
game

Secret to Start Speaking English in 10 Days Learn English Conversation...

Like us on Facebook: https:www.fb.comLearnEnglishConversation Easy and Fun ways to Learn English: http:isharequote.comLearn English Conversation is a free Channel for English learners. You will find free English vocabulary Videos, English grammar Videos, English exercises and English lessons. Thousands of English Videos are waiting for you. They will help you learn English.Please subscribe to update new videos. Subscribe To Update New Lesson: https:www.youtube.comVideoLearnEnglish Like us on Facebook: https:www.facebook.comLearnEnglishConversation
399,532 views | Oct 18, 2013
game

Job Interview Skills Questions and Answers

http:www.engvid.com Job interview tips: some common questions you will be asked and how to answer them! Learn what to say to impress and get that job!
2,090,617 views | Jul 29, 2011
game

Conversation Skills Learn new words and keep a conversation going!

http:www.engvid.com Do people sometimes use words in English that you don't understand? Watch this lesson to learn how you can improve your conversation skills and your vocabulary at the same time! Then test yourself with the quiz: http:www.engvid.comconversation-skills-learn-new-words
569,226 views | Nov 26, 2012
game

Speaking English Bad Habits

http:www.engvid.com Do you bite your nails? That's a bad habit! Watch this lesson to learn vocabulary and expressions to talk about bad habits in English. Then take the quiz: http:www.engvid.combad-habits
445,153 views | Dec 09, 2012
game

Phrasal Verbs in Daily English Conversations

In this English lesson, you will learn how to use certain phrasal verbs in common daily conversations. The two dialogues contain several verbs with the prepositions 'up' and 'down'.To learn more about phrasal verbs, visit our website: http:anglo-link.comFacebook: http:facebook.comAngloLink Twitter: http:twitter.comAngloLinkEnjoy and good luck with your English studies!
597,112 views | Sep 24, 2013
game

How to talk about prices in English Basic Vocabulary

http:www.engvid.com Let's go shopping and talk about money! You don't need to say something costs "five dollars and ninety-eight cents"! We shorten everything. This basic English vocabulary lesson will teach you how to understand prices, and say them like a native speaker! Test your skills with the quiz here: http:www.engvid.comprices-vocabularyTRANSCRIPT: Do you like shopping? I don't. But one thing I do like is saving money and getting a bargain or a deal when I have to go shopping and buy something. What I'm going to teach you is how to talk about prices or how much something costs or how much something was in English. It is difficult, I think, to say numbers or listen to when people tell you how much something costs in English because we don't say, "Ten dollars and seventy-five cents, please." What we do is we take the number, and we divide it. So if I was going shopping, and I wanted to ask someone, I would say, "Hey, how much is this?" If I held the thing in my hand and said, "Excuse me. How much is this?" People would say -- or the person that was trying to sell it to you would say, "It is ten seventy-five." You do not need to go through "ten dollars and seventy-five cents." We just say the first number, then the second number. So this number is "ten seventy-five". Wherever the dot is -- or the decimal point -- that's where we divide the number. This one is "two fifty". This one would be "eighteen twenty-five". Something quite expensive would be "a hundred and eighty-seven forty-two". Now, we do not -- at least I don't -- buy things that are in the thousands. But maybe you're going shopping, and what you're buying is very expensive. If the number is over a hundred -- it's "one thousand eight hundred and seven eighty-seven". It's the same rule. We say the first number, and the cents we just say as a number together. Maybe in your country you use a very, very high or big currency. Most of our purchases are not more than a thousand dollars, depending, of course, on what you're buying. But a typical grocery store or clothing store probably -- maybe, depends how much you eat or what you buy -- it's not going to be over a thousand. So you're not going to have to use "one thousand seven hundred and forty-two" a lot. The other really, really easy thing is that if you don't really understand when people speak very quickly, like, "It's ten seventy-five." "What? Excuse me. How much is this?" "Three eighty-five" "What?" "Three eighty-five." "What?" "Three eighty-five." What you can do is when they type it into the cash register, you can look at the price. Or you can ask them "Please write it down." That way, you can actually see the numbers. Now, I've told you that the person will say, "It is" -- the price. Once you have bought it, you can say to your friends, "Do you like my new shirt?" Your friend's like, "Oh, I love it! Oh, my God! How much was it?" And then you punch your friend for having friends that talk like that. You're going to say, "It was". So after you have bought something, "it was ten seventy-five." "It was two fifty." This is the only grammar, the only two tiny words that you need to use. Yes. No. Don't say this. Don't say this, "The price is" or "the price was"; "the cost is"; "I paid the money". "Did you really pay money?" Of course, you paid money. Do not use these expressions. They're very unnatural. This one is just strange and unnecessary. So the next time you go shopping, try and listen; try and ask people questions; and listen to the price of things. Watch out for the evilness called "tax". People will always say, "Oh, that's eighty-seven thirty-five plus tax." And in Canada, it's not included in the price, so good luck shopping out there. Until next time, goodbye.
231,384 views | Jan 12, 2014
game

Categories

Disclaimer: FetGame.Com is a free flash games and game trailers search engine that indexing and organizing free games on the web. Everyday 1,000+ new flash games, trailers added to this site.

© 2014 - FetGame.Com