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Conversation Skills Giving your opinion

From Youtube.com - Posted: Oct 20, 2013 - 1,215,978 viewsGame | Conversation Skills Giving your opinion | Conversation Skills Giving your opinion
Conversation Skills Giving your opinion
Conversation Skills Giving your opinion
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http:www.engvid.com If someone asks you your opinion, don't say "so-so", or maybe. Tell the person how you feel. In this lesson, learn how to give your opinion! Don't be shy! http:www.engvid.comconversation-skills-giving-your-opinionTRANSCRIPTHello. Welcome to the lesson of giving your opinion. My name is Ronnie. Do me a favor. Go to YouTube. Go to my page, EnglishLessons4U, and subscribe to my channel. Watch out for imitators. I'm the real deal. Be careful. I'm going to teach you guys how to give your opinion. Now, you might think, "Ronnie, I already know how to give my opinion." If someone says, "Hey, do you like pizza?" And I say, "It's so-so." Your opinion is "so-so"? Guess what, that's a really bad answer. So I want to teach you some techniques to continue a conversation when you have to give your opinion. This happens all the time. Maybe you went to a new restaurant or you saw a movie or you went to a new pub or bar or restaurant and you want to tell people, "Oh, my god, it was great! I went to the new restaurant that opened up." And your friend says, "How was it?" And you say, "Okay." What kind of answer is "okay"? Was it good? Was it bad? Did you get diarrhea? Did you like it? What did you eat? So when someone asks you your opinion, instead of giving short, one-word answers -- "Yes." "I liked it." "It was great." -- you need to expand, and you need to give more information. Here is a list of things that you should not say when someone asks your opinion. -"So? How was the movie?" -"So-so." What the hell does "so-so" mean? "So" means "yes" and "no" at the same time? If someone said to me, "It's so-so", I think it's bad. Don't say that. Maybe your friend and you saw the same movie, and someone asks your friend, "Hey, how was the movie?" Your friend said, "Well, it was a little boring, and there wasn't a lot of action. I didn't really like it that much." The conversation naturally would go to you, and you'd go, "Same." Same what? Please don't do this. It's so frustrating when you're trying to have a conversation with someone. Don't say "same". You are an individual. Please give the person your opinion. You can say something like, "Well, I agree. It was boring, but..." -- add your own spice of life; add your own opinion. So instead of saying "same", you can say, "I agree", and then add your information. The next one. Now, if you're a little shy, and someone offers you something, for example, "Would you like to have free English lessons?" "Sure" is a good answer. But if you're giving your opinion, for example, "Did you like the new restaurant that you went to last night?" "Sure." "Sure" is a really, really bad answer. What, again, you want to do is expand in your answer. This is the worst thing you can say if someone asks you your opinion or if they ask you a question about something. As an example, someone might say, -"Ronnie, are you from Canada?" -"Of course." "Well, excuse me for asking." You only are going to use "of course" if someone has asked you a very, very stupid question or a question that they already know the answer to. As an example, you could say, "Ronnie, you're from Canada. Do you have red hair?" And I'd say, "Of course I do. You can see it." So when you answer "of course", it does not mean the same as "yes". "Of course" is a very, very rude way to answer someone's question if they ask you something. So please be very careful of this. "Are you enjoying your English lessons?" "Of course!" Good answer. "Maybe." "Do you like Ronnie, teacher?" "Maybe." Maybe? What does "maybe" mean? So "maybe", "sure ", "same", "so-so" -- garbage. Don't use them. "Maybe" -- are you not going to tell me the answer? Is it a secret? Don't say "maybe". Another one that a lot of you guys say is unnecessary unless you want to exaggerate something. So let's say, again, that you went to a new pizza shop, and you ordered some really spicy pasta -- at a pizza store. That's okay. So you get the pizza or the pasta; it's really spicy, and you eat it, and your friend goes, "Hey how's your spicy pasta?" You're going to say, "It's spicy." You do not need to say, "It's spicy for me" because you are the one talking. So you can just say, "It's spicy." Now, the way that we would use this correctly is to exaggerate something. Example: If you're having pasta that's really, really spicy, and your friend is having the same pasta dish, maybe your friend is eating it and goes, "This is not spicy for me." You're exaggerating that one is spicy and one isn't. So you're eating it; you're dying; you're crying; your face is turning red; you say, "God, this is spicy." Your friend's, like, "This isn't spicy for me." So you're exaggerating your point. Be careful about this one.So these ones: Don't use them. This one: Only if you're exaggerating a point. These -- are the good ones. These are the good guys. These ones don't exist anymore.

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game | Good Manners What to Say and Do Polite English

Good Manners What to Say and Do Polite English

http:www.engvid.com Learning English? Then you must learn about English culture and etiquette too. I'll tell you the one secret you MUST know to be accepted in North American and British cultures. You'll also learn 12 other good habits if you're studying, working, living, or traveling overseas. This is a cross-cultural English lesson you cannot afford to miss. Take a quiz on this lesson here: http:www.engvid.comgood-manners-polite-englishTRANSCRIPTHi, my name is Rebecca from www.engvid.com. In today's lesson, we will be talking about good manners or what can also be referred to sometimes as cross-cultural skills. What does that mean? It's the skills that you need to function effectively in a different culture than your own. So for example: if I were to come to your country and learn your language, do you think that would be enough? Not really, because along with the language, I also need to learn what's acceptable, what's not okay in that particular culture. So today, we'll be talking about 12 things that you need to say and do when you're living or working in an English speaking environment. Okay? Let's get started.So first we'll talk about what you should say. The first one is using the word: "please". Now, everybody knows that you should say "please", but not everybody remembers to actually say it. So for example: if you go into a coffee shop, don't just say: "Coffee." Say: "Coffee, please." Or if you're asking someone else to do something, also remember: "Could you please turn off your cellphone?", for example. All right?Next: remember to say "thank you" whenever somebody does something. "Thank you", "You're welcome": these are phrases that we do use very often in English. And it could be for anything simple like somebody holding the door for you or it could be for something more elaborate like somebody giving you a birthday present. Okay? The way you say it, say it from your heart. Okay? "Thank you.", "Thank you very much." And so on. The next one is to say "sorry", or even better to say "I'm sorry", because "I'm sorry" is more personal. But otherwise, at least say "sorry". And again, you can say "sorry" for little things like perhaps stepping on someone's foot or if you bang into someone by mistake, you bump into someone by mistake somewhere in a crowded place, still apologize, say: "I'm sorry.", "I'm sorry.", "I'm sorry." Okay? We do use that quite often. Next one: "Excuse me." Now, "excuse me" you can say when you sneeze. Right? [Achoo!]. "Excuse me." Or if you need to ask somebody for some information, you can say: "Excuse me, would you know where the nearest subway is?" Right? So this is a very useful expression and it's also a polite expression. The next one is to remember to greet people and also to wish people. By greeting people, even at work if you're working in an English speaking environment, remember we do say "good morning", "good night", "happy birthday", "happy New Year", "congratulations". So greet people, and also wish them on the appropriate days. The next one might seem obvious also, but again, it's the way that you do it. Even if you work in an office, in the morning, we can say: "Hey, good morning. How are you?" And when you ask: "How are you?" even though you're not expected to give a full answer, but whatever answer someone gives you, remember to listen. Don't start talking right away. Wait to hear if the other person is saying: "Oh, pretty good. I'm fine. How are you?" Hear all of that before you start speaking about your own disposition, your own state of mind. Okay? Listen to the answer. All right? So these are six things that you must remember to do; they are taken for granted and they are expected of you. Next: let's look at what you should do. This seventh one here says: "Smile." Smiling creates a more friendly environment and it's certainly expected. So try to do that, again, it doesn't mean you have to keep smiling, but when you meet someone, give them a smile. If you don't smile, they might think that you're nervous, they might think you're angry or unhappy about something. Okay? Or they might take it a little bit aggressively. So try to smile, it makes the... It also gives people the message that everything is okay, not just that you're happy to meet them, but that everything is fine with you. So it says two things: something about you and something about the other person. Next: shake hands. Now, that's usually in a more business-like situation; in an office or somewhere, and certainly when you meet somebody for the first time. In an English speaking environment, you are expected to shake hands and shake hands rather firmly. Don't shake hands very weakly or just hold a part of the hand. Hold the entire hand and shake it firmly. All right? That's, again, part of the office expectation and the business norm.
4,534 views | Oct 09, 2013
game
game | Conversation Skills Speak with confidence

Conversation Skills Speak with confidence

http:www.engvid.com Don't be shy! Use your English ability to talk to anyone! If you make a mistake, don't worry... just keep talking and you'll improve your conversation skills! Watch this video now to learn how confidence will make you a better and more interesting speaker.
2,277 views | Aug 10, 2011
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game | 3 tips for sounding like a native speaker

3 tips for sounding like a native speaker

http:www.engvid.com "That'll be 66 cents please." "Sikysi... what?" Having a hard time understanding native speed English? This lesson will give you some tips on how to sound like a native speaker as well as how to understand what you hear by breaking down expressions into their individual word and sounds. http:www.engvid.com3-tips-for-sounding-like-a-native-speakerTRANSCRIPTHi again, welcome back to www.engvid.com. I'm Adam. Today, I'm going to help you sound a little bit more like a native speaker, hopefully. Students ask me all the time: "How can I sound like a native speaker?" Well, before I say anything, let me just tell you that it will take time and a lot, a lot, a lot of practice. The best way is to live in an English-speaking country, of course, but of course you can do it anywhere, but it takes time; be patient, practice, practice, practice. So we're looking at pronunciation. Let me start with this word: "pronunciation". Not: "pronounciation". It is not a pronoun. A pronoun is: "I", "me", "my", "mine". Pronunciation is how we speak English. So I'm going to give you three tips that will help you sound a little bit more like a native speaker. We're going to start with connecting words. Now, think about your own language, whether you're speaking Spanish or Polish or Chinese, you do this in your language as well. When you're speaking fast, you're taking words and you're squeezing them together; you're connecting them, so one word flows into the next word. That's what we're going to do here. You can connect consonants to consonants. What this means: when a word ends in a consonant... A consonant is "b", "c", "d", "f", "g", etc. A vowel is "a", "e", "i", "o", "u". When a word ends in a consonant and the next word begins with the same consonant, drop the first one. So for example: we do not say: "black coffee", we don't say: "ke, ke". There's only one "k": "bla coffee", "bla coffee." Okay? Practice that. Now, "t" and "d", these are two different consonants, but according to the tongue and the mouth, they almost sound the same so we do the same thing. "Wha do you do?", "Wha do you do?" But again, another thing you have to keep in mind is when we say it fast, we also don't really say "e", we say like a... Sort of like a small... We don't say "o" - sorry -, we say sort of a small "e". "Wha do ye do?" Practice that. "Wha do ye do?" Strange, huh? No "t", "wha", "de ye do?", "Wha de ye do?" That's how a native speaker would say it naturally. Now, another thing is when a word ends in a consonant and the next word begins in a vowel, make sure you roll it in. Right? Roll the consonant into the vowel and separate the syllable before. A syllable is the vowel sounds in a word. Okay? So nobody, like native speakers don't say: "Not at all. Oh no, not at all." We don't say it like that. We say: "Oh, not-at-all.", "Not-at-all.", "Not-at-all." Right? The "t", so this becomes: "No-ta-tall", "No-ta-tall", "Not at all". Okay? Say it quickly, blend the letters one into the next. But again, practice it.Now, for those of you who are going to be taking a test, an English test that involves listening; IELTS, TOEFL, TOEIC, if you're in Canada you're maybe doing a CELPIP test. Okay? This is going to help you on the listening section as well. This is one of the things they're testing. Somebody on the recording will say: "Not-at-all", and you need to cut: "Not at all", you need to understand the separate words, that's part of the test. So practice speaking it, practice listening to it. Another thing we do is we squeeze some words. Okay? Certain words, we don't say all the syllables, we don't even say all the letters. I've heard many students say: "Com-fort-able", "com-fort-able", but native speakers, we don't say this part, we don't say the "or". We say: "Comf-ta-bil", and notice the last sound is like a small tiny, tiny little "i" in there. "Comftabil", "comf-ta-bil", "comftabil". Okay? We don't pronounce the "or": "Comfortable". Nope, don't do that.Another word like that: "Interesting". "In-chre-sting". Find out what the syllables are so: "In-ter" - sorry, my mistake -, "In-ter-rest-ing". If you want to emphasize something, we have a word called: "enunciate". When someone wants to emphasize a word, then they enunciate each syllable; they say each syllable separately. "Oh, that is very in-ter-est-ing." Right? Because I want you to understand that the word is interesting, but in every day speech: "Intresting", "in-tre-sting". "In-ter-est-ing", I have four syllables, when I actually say it naturally, it becomes three syllables and the "t" and the "r" become like a "ch", but that's... We'll talk about that next. Another word: "every". "E-vry". I don't say: "Ev-er-y", I don't say this letter "e", "ev-er-y". "E-vry", "evryone", "evrything", "evry".
3,680 views | Oct 21, 2013
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game | 5 conversation phrasal verbs you need to know

5 conversation phrasal verbs you need to know

http:www.engvid.com These 5 phrasal verbs are used every day by native speakers to help them "catch up" with friends and "work out" problems at home and work. Study this video and you won't ever feel cut off in a conversation. Take a quiz on this lesson here: http:www.engvid.com5-conversation-phrasal-verbsTRANSCRIPTOkay, James. Product placement right about now. Apple Computers, take one. Hi. James from EngVid. Yeah. We're getting sponsored by Apple. "Sponsored" means someone is paying you to do something. No, it's not the case. And just so you know, this is the cheap version that's old. One of you guys made a guess last time I held it up. You're like, "It's the Apple 5 with retinal scan!" I don't even know what that is, so don't ask me. Okay? So -- but Mr. E and I, we get to work on my computer, and we're going to tell a story. Mr. E, ready? Okay. So "Mr. E helped to blank blank my new computer. It's not new. It something something well, and we finished early. However, it something something Mr. E had forgotten to pay his electric bill, so the power was something something -- wow, a lot of 'something somethings'. We sat in the -- excuse me. We sat in the dark" -- stop. The end. This is a stupid story. I'm going to try and do a better story. Mr. E, help me, okay? Now, Mr. E -- first of all, I should tell you what this is about. I'm giving you five phrasal verbs that are commonly used in conversation that will help you have, you know, a more interesting conversation, but not just that. Because these are used commonly in conversation, you can understand what people are saying because I'm going to try and teach you not just one --no sirree Bob! We're having a sale today. James's sale -- you're going to get two for the price of one meaning, so you can understand this story, but when you're done, you can go back and actually build your own stories or usages, okay? So let's go to the beginning."Mr. E helped me to something at my new computer." Well laptops are different. You just put it in a room. In the old days and even now, some people buy big computers, and they have speakers and they have the box and, you know, the big screen. And you have to put it somewhere. Well, when you put it somewhere, you know, you want to arrange or build a system. We call that a "set up". You set it up. It means to put it or arrange it in a way you can use it. You "set up" a business, right? It's a system, you know. You know you buy; you sell -- it's a system. So setting something up is to arrange it or organize it or build a thing that you can use. That's one definition, "set up". What's the second one?" To place somebody in an awkward situation". Interesting. Sometimes you're watching the movies -- I'm sure you watch many of them -- someone will say, "He set me up that so-and-so." Well, what it means is they knew something about the person; they pretended they didn't know; then, they got other people to come around to expose or get the truth out. That's called a "setup". The police "set up" criminals all the time, right? They pretend to buy drugs. They pretend, but they don't actually want to buy them. The criminal sells them, and then they catch them. And they say, "It was a setup from the beginning", and the police go, "Yeah, and you fell for it." When you "fall" for something, you believe it's true even though it's not, okay? So "set up" here means two things: to arrange a system; that's one thing, and that's what we did with my computer system. It's not an awkward situation. We've arranged and built a system, right? So let's set up. Let's go back. Mr. E helped me to set up my new computer. That means we put it on a table, got the speakers, plugged it in, made it work. Cool, right? Next, "It w___ o___ well and we finished early." "W___ o___ well" -- what could that be? W-o, w-o. Well, look. See this other arrow comes down here. What does that mean? Well, it means fix a problem -- or couples fix a relationship -- and come to a successful end. Well, what we're talking about is work because when you have a problem you must work, right? To come to a successful end means you must do some work first to come to the end. Running a race; making dinner; fixing a problem. Fixing a problem requires work. Couples have to work on a relationship. And we also have this "this worked out". And if you're like Arnold Schwarzenegger, you have big muscles because you work out. That's my best Arnold impersonation. Okay, so Arnold works out, but that's different. So we also say -- and I should've put it here -- "go to gym", right? Because a lot of times I hear foreign students say, "Teacher, we go exercising now." And I always go, "[laugh] You go exercise. Right." North Americans, English speakers, they "work out". That's what we do when we go to the gym. It is exercising, but that's our word. Be here we say, "It worked out well".
2,987 views | Oct 11, 2013
game
game | Transportation Vocabulary Phrasal Verbs GET ON, GET OUT OF, RIDE, GO

Transportation Vocabulary Phrasal Verbs GET ON, GET OUT OF, RIDE, GO

http:www.engvid.com I GET OFF a train, bus, or subway. But: I GET OUT OF a car or taxi. I RIDE a bike and a motorcycle. How do you get to work or school? Learn how to use phrasal verbs to talk about transportation, then test yourself on the quiz at http:www.engvid.comtransportation-vocabulary-phrasal-verbsHello. How are you? Today, we're going to learn about getting around. This means taking public transportation or talking about how you got somewhere or how you're going to go somewhere. All of the examples I've written in the past tense because somebody might ask you, "How did you get here?" "What? I flew because I have a magic carpet. That's how. Why?"We have different ways of getting places. Verbs: You can say, "I took a 'bus', a 'train', a 'cab', or a 'taxi'." "Cab" and "taxi" are the same. Or you can take a "plane". So with all of these nouns -- "plane", "cab", "taxi", "train", "bus" -- you're going to use the verb "took". There are no exceptions. You cannot say, "I rode a bus. I rode a train." It's wrong. "Rode" means that you were on top of the bus or on the train doing some bus surfing -- didn't happen.I hear people say this a lot, "How did you get here?" "I ride car." "Wow. What were you doing on top of the car?" If you "ride" something, you're always on top of it. What can you -- what can you ride? I can ride a bicycle. So "ride" literally means you're on top of something. Tell me what you can ride. You can ride a bicycle, a motorcycle, a scooter, a moped. If you're on top of it, you're riding it -- a horse."I go by car." No, no, no. These, unfortunately, are wrong. We don't say, "I go by car" or "I ride car." We say, very easily, past tense of the verb "drive": "drove". "How did you get here?" "I drove." You do not need to say, "I drove by car" because you're not driving a bus; you're not driving an airplane; you're not driving a train. Very simply, you can say, "I drove."Another thing that I hear people say is, "I go by foot." "One foot? You have one foot? Did you hop here the whole time? You must be tired. You go by foot? Wow." Maybe you only have one foot. That's cool. You should drive or take a bus. Another thing: "I walk on foot." This means that you take your hands, and you literally put them underneath your feet and you walk -- if this is your foot -- you walk on your hands. This is painful. I do not recommend this. I would not literally want to walk on my hands. Please don't walk on your feet. Do not walk on your hands. "I walk on your foot" would be, "I'm sorry" -- walk on hands, walk on feet. You'd be stepping on your feet, and you would never get anywhere. You just want to say, "I walked." "How did you get here today, Ronnie?" "I walked."Another thing that's really confusing in English -- and I understand why -- is when to use the phrasal verb "got on" or "got off", and when to say "got in" or "got out". So as an example, we would say, "I got off the train." Let's write that down. Or you can say, "I got on the train." Also, we use this with a bus. So you can say, "I got on the bus" and "I got off the bus." You don't need to use extra words. Like, you don't want to say, "I got off on the bus." You don't want to say, "I got the train off." Unnecessary. Please do not use extra words when you say this. You're just going to say, "I got on" -- the verb -- the noun. Or "I got off", the noun."Train", "bus", and the "plane", or an "airplane". So think about this: What does -- or what do trains, buses, and airplanes have in common? No? Nothing? No? Okay. A train, a bus, or an airplane has many people. You can think of it as something that is public or very large. So a train, a bus, or an airplane, you have to pay. It's really big, and you can fit many people on it. So you're going to get on or get off something that is very big. You're going to get off something that's very big. Or if it's public transportation, you can fit many people.
4,683 views | Dec 13, 2013
game
game | Learn English vocabulary in the BATHROOM

Learn English vocabulary in the BATHROOM

http:www.engvid.com Is there a difference between a BATHROOM and a WASHROOM? Today's English lesson is all about RESTROOM vocabulary! It has many names, and I bet you visit this place many times every day. Lets make sure you can talk about it properly. Avoid making embarrassing mistakes by learning some very common words. When you're done, wash your hands and take the quiz! EngVid: Don't take a dump without it. http:www.engvid.comenglish-vocabulary-bathroomTRANSCRIPT"Teacher! Teacher! Ronnie! Ronnie! Can I go -- can I go bathroom?" "What? 'Can I go bathroom?' Okay. 'Can I go to the bathroom?' Yes. 'Can I go bathroom?' No. Not in here, please. If you said, "Can I go bathroom", that means that you are going to pee where you are. Please go to the bathroom or the washroom to pee.Today's lesson is all about going to the toilet. This thing is called a "plunger". Plunge, plunge, plunge! What do you do with this in the bathroom, you wonder? This is a plunger. What we use this for is in the toilet.So let's imagine that your friend, your mother, your father, your brother, your sister, or you ate a lot of food last night. And then, you went to the toilet. You took a massive dump. What is a "massive dump"? A "massive dump" is slang. "Take a massive dump." "Massive" means very big, and "dump" -- let me draw it for you -- means poo. Unchi! Japanese style. So "take a massive dump" means "to have a bowel movement", if you will. Okay? But it's so large that maybe it clogs or plugged the toilet. So that means I cannot flush the toilet. Now, basic bathroom etiquette. Please, when you have finished whatever you're doing in there, please always flush the toilet. There's a little mechanism on the toilet. It's usually a silver color. It's very easy. You press it. All of the water and all of the extra things in the toilet floating here -- maybe you have some poo -- it goes away so that the next person does not have to see what you ate for dinner. I don't want to see that. "Oh, Uncle John had corn last night." Unnecessary for me to see. So please, I beg of you, if you are going to use the toilet, please flush it, okay?There was a rhyme that I knew -- I still know it. It's called, "If it's yellow, let it mellow. If it's brown, flush it down." I would like to change the poem to say, "Flush the toilet. I don't care what color it is. I don't want to see it." Or you're going to be getting one of these stuck in your face. So rule No. 1: Flush the toilet, okay? With a plunger, you are going to -- as I said -- unclog the plugged toilet.What happens in a toilet or in a sink is you have a drain, okay? A "drain" is a hole at the bottom where all the water goes into. It goes to Magic Land. Okay? So the sink and the toilet both have a drain, as does your bathtub and your shower. What happens is hair or other debris gets stuck in the drain. So the drain gets clogged or plugged. It basically means that all of this stuff can't go down the pipe, and it backs up. So the water doesn't go down. Dangerous with a toilet. Not as bad with a sink. Acceptable with a bathtub and a shower. All you need to do is plunge it. Make sure it's clean.Now, what do you do in a sink? Usually, when you go to the sink, you wash your hands. Rule No. 2: After you go to the toilet, you flush the toilet, okay? Then, it's really, really cool. It's the coolest thing ever that you wash your hands. Especially for men. Guys, what are you touching? What are you doing? I don't want to touch a doorknob that you have touched after you've taken -- sorry. After you've gone to the toilet. You've touched your man part. You did not wash your hand, and then you touched the doorknob. I'm touching your knob, too, okay? Literally. I don't want to touch your knob. Please wash your hands after you flush the toilet. Good.Another thing that you might find in a bathroom or a washroom is a bathtub, andor you may have a shower. Now, the difference between a bathtub and a shower, it's very easy. When you have or take a bath, you're going to do it in the bathtub. In the bathtub, you get to lie down. You get to relax. Maybe you have some bubbles. Maybe you have a rubber ducky. That's a duck, okay? I'm an artist. That's a duck.A shower, it's very small, and you don't have enough room to lie down, so you are going to stand up in the shower, okay? It doesn't matter if you say the verb "take" or "have". So you can say, "I'm going to have a bath. I'm going to take a bath. Or I'm going to have a shower. I'm going to take a shower." The other thing that you can say is -- "shower" is also a verb. So you can say, "I'm going to shower. I'm going to shower." You can't say, "I'm going to bath, or I'm going to bathtub." Because "bathtub" and "bath" -- these guys are only nouns, okay? A shower can be a verb and a noun. English is so confusing sometimes. Even when you're just trying to be clean. I'll help you. Don't worry.
1,478 views | May 07, 2014
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