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Conversation Skills Giving your opinion

From Youtube.com - Posted: Oct 20, 2013 - 414,340 viewsGame | Conversation Skills Giving your opinion | Conversation Skills Giving your opinion
Conversation Skills Giving your opinion
Conversation Skills Giving your opinion
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www.engvid.com/ If someone asks you your opinion, don't say "so-so", or maybe. Tell the person how you feel. In this lesson, learn how to give your opinion! Don't be shy! www.engvid.com/conversation-skills-giving-your-opinion/TRANSCRIPTHello. Welcome to the lesson of giving your opinion. My name is Ronnie. Do me a favor. Go to YouTube. Go to my page, EnglishLessons4U, and subscribe to my channel. Watch out for imitators. I'm the real deal. Be careful. I'm going to teach you guys how to give your opinion. Now, you might think, "Ronnie, I already know how to give my opinion." If someone says, "Hey, do you like pizza?" And I say, "It's so-so." Your opinion is "so-so"? Guess what, that's a really bad answer. So I want to teach you some techniques to continue a conversation when you have to give your opinion. This happens all the time. Maybe you went to a new restaurant or you saw a movie or you went to a new pub or bar or restaurant and you want to tell people, "Oh, my god, it was great! I went to the new restaurant that opened up." And your friend says, "How was it?" And you say, "Okay." What kind of answer is "okay"? Was it good? Was it bad? Did you get diarrhea? Did you like it? What did you eat? So when someone asks you your opinion, instead of giving short, one-word answers -- "Yes." "I liked it." "It was great." -- you need to expand, and you need to give more information. Here is a list of things that you should not say when someone asks your opinion. -"So? How was the movie?" -"So-so." What the hell does "so-so" mean? "So" means "yes" and "no" at the same time? If someone said to me, "It's so-so", I think it's bad. Don't say that. Maybe your friend and you saw the same movie, and someone asks your friend, "Hey, how was the movie?" Your friend said, "Well, it was a little boring, and there wasn't a lot of action. I didn't really like it that much." The conversation naturally would go to you, and you'd go, "Same." Same what? Please don't do this. It's so frustrating when you're trying to have a conversation with someone. Don't say "same". You are an individual. Please give the person your opinion. You can say something like, "Well, I agree. It was boring, but..." -- add your own spice of life; add your own opinion. So instead of saying "same", you can say, "I agree", and then add your information. The next one. Now, if you're a little shy, and someone offers you something, for example, "Would you like to have free English lessons?" "Sure" is a good answer. But if you're giving your opinion, for example, "Did you like the new restaurant that you went to last night?" "Sure." "Sure" is a really, really bad answer. What, again, you want to do is expand in your answer. This is the worst thing you can say if someone asks you your opinion or if they ask you a question about something. As an example, someone might say, -"Ronnie, are you from Canada?" -"Of course." "Well, excuse me for asking." You only are going to use "of course" if someone has asked you a very, very stupid question or a question that they already know the answer to. As an example, you could say, "Ronnie, you're from Canada. Do you have red hair?" And I'd say, "Of course I do. You can see it." So when you answer "of course", it does not mean the same as "yes". "Of course" is a very, very rude way to answer someone's question if they ask you something. So please be very careful of this. "Are you enjoying your English lessons?" "Of course!" Good answer. "Maybe." "Do you like Ronnie, teacher?" "Maybe." Maybe? What does "maybe" mean? So "maybe", "sure ", "same", "so-so" -- garbage. Don't use them. "Maybe" -- are you not going to tell me the answer? Is it a secret? Don't say "maybe". Another one that a lot of you guys say is unnecessary unless you want to exaggerate something. So let's say, again, that you went to a new pizza shop, and you ordered some really spicy pasta -- at a pizza store. That's okay. So you get the pizza or the pasta; it's really spicy, and you eat it, and your friend goes, "Hey how's your spicy pasta?" You're going to say, "It's spicy." You do not need to say, "It's spicy for me" because you are the one talking. So you can just say, "It's spicy." Now, the way that we would use this correctly is to exaggerate something. Example: If you're having pasta that's really, really spicy, and your friend is having the same pasta dish, maybe your friend is eating it and goes, "This is not spicy for me." You're exaggerating that one is spicy and one isn't. So you're eating it; you're dying; you're crying; your face is turning red; you say, "God, this is spicy." Your friend's, like, "This isn't spicy for me." So you're exaggerating your point. Be careful about this one.So these ones: Don't use them. This one: Only if you're exaggerating a point. These -- are the good ones. These are the good guys. These ones don't exist anymore.

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Learn English Basic Kitchen Vocabulary

http:www.engvid.com Let's go in the kitchen and cook! You will learn basic kitchen vocabulary to help you in the kitchen! You can use an oven to bake a cake, a kettle to make tea, and a fry pan to cook eggs! After watching this lesson, check out Adam's lesson on more advanced cooking vocabulary at http:www.engvid.comcooking-vocabulary and take the quiz on this lesson at http:www.engvid.combasic-kitchen-vocabularyTRANSCRIPTHello. Are you hungry? You better get to the kitchen. "The chicken? The kitchen." Chicken -- kitchen. Today, I'm going to teach you about vocabulary that you will find very useful if you've ever been in a kitchen. Now, the thing that's confusing sometimes is that when you want to say "kitchen", you say "chicken". Oh, no! It's okay. It's funny. I do it all the time. Do I do it all the time? It's a very natural mistake. So if you're ever having a conversation in English, and you say "chicken" instead of "kitchen", don't worry. But we're going to go through some kitchen vocabulary. My name is Ronnie. Let me take you through the magic of the kitchen. The very, very first word that I'm going to teach you is "nuke". "Nuke?" "Nuke" is a verb, and it's a new word from the 1980s. That's so new. It's 30 years old. "Nuke" is the verb that we use for a microwave. A microwave maybe came out in 1981; I don't know. I remember in my house getting one in 1983, and I could make popcorn, and it was amazing. So about the 1980s, we had this amazing thing called a "microwave". You probably know what a "microwave" is. But if you don't, it's like a little oven that cooks your food really, really quickly. We actually developed a new word for this. We call it "nuke". So I can say, "I nuke my food." That means, "I put my food in the microwave." Ding, ding, ding! And it's ready to eat. The next thing that we have is an "oven" or a "stove". Now, "oven" and "stove" -- same word. It does not matter if you say "oven" or "stove". Who cares? I don't. An "oven" or a "stove" -- properly, the "stove" is actually a "stove top" where you would put things on top of the stovetop. And the "oven" is actually this part inside where you open the door. Inside the oven part, at the bottom here, you can bake a cake for me. I like cheesecake. If you'd like to bake me a cake, please do send it to me at www.engvid.com. I will be happy to eat it. You can "grill" or "broil". Now, "grill" and "broil" are the same. It just depends on what your oven says. When you "bake" something, the heat comes from the top and the bottom of the oven, and it's distributed throughout. If you "grill" or "broil" something, the heat comes from the top, and it cooks it on the top of the meat or whatever you're cooking. So the "broil" and the "grill" -- the heat comes from the top. And "bake"; the heat comes from the top and the bottom. So depending on what you're cooking would be the setting on what you're going to use on your oven or your stove. When we bake something, we usually have a certain temperature -- 250 degrees, or you can have 400 degrees. One is Fahrenheit, and one is Celsius. Most of them have both, but if you don't know on your recipe, you could always look on the Internet. It's magic. The next thing -- speaking about magic -- is a toaster. This is the most magical machine ever to be invented in your kitchen. Let me explain the magic of the toaster. You take a simple piece of bread. You put it in the toaster; press the button down; you wait. "Bing!" Out comes lovely, warm, crusty toast. This machine, very simply, is called a "toaster". So you put bread into the toaster -- like magic, it becomes "toast". The next appliance we have is a "kettle". Now, if you like to drink tea or coffee, you're going to love to have a kettle. A "kettle" is a machine that boils water. You can have one on your stovetop, or you can also have one that plugs into the wall. I'm not a very good artist -- or am I? But if you can kind of use your imagination, these both are called "kettles"; they're used for boiling water. Do you like coffee? I love coffee. We also have what's called a "coffeemaker". I know. Sometimes, English makes sense. Guess what this makes. Coffee. So you press some buttons -- some magic; water turns into coffee. It's like water into wine but not as nice. Better in the morning, though. The next thing that we have, another big appliance -- these, by the way, are called "appliances" -- is a "refrigerator". We never bother saying "refrigerator". We say "fridge". And on top of the fridge, we have a "freezer". Now, all of it is called a "fridge", but the top part is called a "freezer". A "freezer" is where there's going to be ice, and things in it are going to be frozen. Frozen. So let's say that you have a delicious frozen dinner, and you want to nuke it. You're going to put it in the microwave.
211,258 views | Jan 29, 2014
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