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Conversation Skills Giving your opinion

From Youtube.com - Posted: Oct 20, 2013 - 297,004 viewsGame | Conversation Skills Giving your opinion | Conversation Skills Giving your opinion
Conversation Skills Giving your opinion
Conversation Skills Giving your opinion
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www.engvid.com/ If someone asks you your opinion, don't say "so-so", or maybe. Tell the person how you feel. In this lesson, learn how to give your opinion! Don't be shy! www.engvid.com/conversation-skills-giving-your-opinion/TRANSCRIPTHello. Welcome to the lesson of giving your opinion. My name is Ronnie. Do me a favor. Go to YouTube. Go to my page, EnglishLessons4U, and subscribe to my channel. Watch out for imitators. I'm the real deal. Be careful. I'm going to teach you guys how to give your opinion. Now, you might think, "Ronnie, I already know how to give my opinion." If someone says, "Hey, do you like pizza?" And I say, "It's so-so." Your opinion is "so-so"? Guess what, that's a really bad answer. So I want to teach you some techniques to continue a conversation when you have to give your opinion. This happens all the time. Maybe you went to a new restaurant or you saw a movie or you went to a new pub or bar or restaurant and you want to tell people, "Oh, my god, it was great! I went to the new restaurant that opened up." And your friend says, "How was it?" And you say, "Okay." What kind of answer is "okay"? Was it good? Was it bad? Did you get diarrhea? Did you like it? What did you eat? So when someone asks you your opinion, instead of giving short, one-word answers -- "Yes." "I liked it." "It was great." -- you need to expand, and you need to give more information. Here is a list of things that you should not say when someone asks your opinion. -"So? How was the movie?" -"So-so." What the hell does "so-so" mean? "So" means "yes" and "no" at the same time? If someone said to me, "It's so-so", I think it's bad. Don't say that. Maybe your friend and you saw the same movie, and someone asks your friend, "Hey, how was the movie?" Your friend said, "Well, it was a little boring, and there wasn't a lot of action. I didn't really like it that much." The conversation naturally would go to you, and you'd go, "Same." Same what? Please don't do this. It's so frustrating when you're trying to have a conversation with someone. Don't say "same". You are an individual. Please give the person your opinion. You can say something like, "Well, I agree. It was boring, but..." -- add your own spice of life; add your own opinion. So instead of saying "same", you can say, "I agree", and then add your information. The next one. Now, if you're a little shy, and someone offers you something, for example, "Would you like to have free English lessons?" "Sure" is a good answer. But if you're giving your opinion, for example, "Did you like the new restaurant that you went to last night?" "Sure." "Sure" is a really, really bad answer. What, again, you want to do is expand in your answer. This is the worst thing you can say if someone asks you your opinion or if they ask you a question about something. As an example, someone might say, -"Ronnie, are you from Canada?" -"Of course." "Well, excuse me for asking." You only are going to use "of course" if someone has asked you a very, very stupid question or a question that they already know the answer to. As an example, you could say, "Ronnie, you're from Canada. Do you have red hair?" And I'd say, "Of course I do. You can see it." So when you answer "of course", it does not mean the same as "yes". "Of course" is a very, very rude way to answer someone's question if they ask you something. So please be very careful of this. "Are you enjoying your English lessons?" "Of course!" Good answer. "Maybe." "Do you like Ronnie, teacher?" "Maybe." Maybe? What does "maybe" mean? So "maybe", "sure ", "same", "so-so" -- garbage. Don't use them. "Maybe" -- are you not going to tell me the answer? Is it a secret? Don't say "maybe". Another one that a lot of you guys say is unnecessary unless you want to exaggerate something. So let's say, again, that you went to a new pizza shop, and you ordered some really spicy pasta -- at a pizza store. That's okay. So you get the pizza or the pasta; it's really spicy, and you eat it, and your friend goes, "Hey how's your spicy pasta?" You're going to say, "It's spicy." You do not need to say, "It's spicy for me" because you are the one talking. So you can just say, "It's spicy." Now, the way that we would use this correctly is to exaggerate something. Example: If you're having pasta that's really, really spicy, and your friend is having the same pasta dish, maybe your friend is eating it and goes, "This is not spicy for me." You're exaggerating that one is spicy and one isn't. So you're eating it; you're dying; you're crying; your face is turning red; you say, "God, this is spicy." Your friend's, like, "This isn't spicy for me." So you're exaggerating your point. Be careful about this one.So these ones: Don't use them. This one: Only if you're exaggerating a point. These -- are the good ones. These are the good guys. These ones don't exist anymore.

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Good Manners What to Say and Do Polite English

http:www.engvid.com Learning English? Then you must learn about English culture and etiquette too. I'll tell you the one secret you MUST know to be accepted in North American and British cultures. You'll also learn 12 other good habits if you're studying, working, living, or traveling overseas. This is a cross-cultural English lesson you cannot afford to miss. Take a quiz on this lesson here: http:www.engvid.comgood-manners-polite-englishTRANSCRIPTHi, my name is Rebecca from www.engvid.com. In today's lesson, we will be talking about good manners or what can also be referred to sometimes as cross-cultural skills. What does that mean? It's the skills that you need to function effectively in a different culture than your own. So for example: if I were to come to your country and learn your language, do you think that would be enough? Not really, because along with the language, I also need to learn what's acceptable, what's not okay in that particular culture. So today, we'll be talking about 12 things that you need to say and do when you're living or working in an English speaking environment. Okay? Let's get started.So first we'll talk about what you should say. The first one is using the word: "please". Now, everybody knows that you should say "please", but not everybody remembers to actually say it. So for example: if you go into a coffee shop, don't just say: "Coffee." Say: "Coffee, please." Or if you're asking someone else to do something, also remember: "Could you please turn off your cellphone?", for example. All right?Next: remember to say "thank you" whenever somebody does something. "Thank you", "You're welcome": these are phrases that we do use very often in English. And it could be for anything simple like somebody holding the door for you or it could be for something more elaborate like somebody giving you a birthday present. Okay? The way you say it, say it from your heart. Okay? "Thank you.", "Thank you very much." And so on. The next one is to say "sorry", or even better to say "I'm sorry", because "I'm sorry" is more personal. But otherwise, at least say "sorry". And again, you can say "sorry" for little things like perhaps stepping on someone's foot or if you bang into someone by mistake, you bump into someone by mistake somewhere in a crowded place, still apologize, say: "I'm sorry.", "I'm sorry.", "I'm sorry." Okay? We do use that quite often. Next one: "Excuse me." Now, "excuse me" you can say when you sneeze. Right? [Achoo!]. "Excuse me." Or if you need to ask somebody for some information, you can say: "Excuse me, would you know where the nearest subway is?" Right? So this is a very useful expression and it's also a polite expression. The next one is to remember to greet people and also to wish people. By greeting people, even at work if you're working in an English speaking environment, remember we do say "good morning", "good night", "happy birthday", "happy New Year", "congratulations". So greet people, and also wish them on the appropriate days. The next one might seem obvious also, but again, it's the way that you do it. Even if you work in an office, in the morning, we can say: "Hey, good morning. How are you?" And when you ask: "How are you?" even though you're not expected to give a full answer, but whatever answer someone gives you, remember to listen. Don't start talking right away. Wait to hear if the other person is saying: "Oh, pretty good. I'm fine. How are you?" Hear all of that before you start speaking about your own disposition, your own state of mind. Okay? Listen to the answer. All right? So these are six things that you must remember to do; they are taken for granted and they are expected of you. Next: let's look at what you should do. This seventh one here says: "Smile." Smiling creates a more friendly environment and it's certainly expected. So try to do that, again, it doesn't mean you have to keep smiling, but when you meet someone, give them a smile. If you don't smile, they might think that you're nervous, they might think you're angry or unhappy about something. Okay? Or they might take it a little bit aggressively. So try to smile, it makes the... It also gives people the message that everything is okay, not just that you're happy to meet them, but that everything is fine with you. So it says two things: something about you and something about the other person. Next: shake hands. Now, that's usually in a more business-like situation; in an office or somewhere, and certainly when you meet somebody for the first time. In an English speaking environment, you are expected to shake hands and shake hands rather firmly. Don't shake hands very weakly or just hold a part of the hand. Hold the entire hand and shake it firmly. All right? That's, again, part of the office expectation and the business norm.
137,355 views | Oct 09, 2013
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Secret to Start Speaking English in 10 Days Learn English Conversation...

Click Here: http:bit.lySecretToSuccessEnglish To Join 8 Secrets to English Success Course Fluent English in 3 months: http:bit.lyFluentin3months Learn English Easily and Fast: http:bit.lyEffortlessEnglishLessonLike us on Facebook: https:www.facebook.comLearnEnglishConversation Inspirational Quotes to Learn English: http:isharequote.com Learn English Conversation is a free Channel for English learners. You will find free English vocabulary Videos, English grammar Videos, English exercises and English lessons. Thousands of English Videos are waiting for you. They will help you learn English.Please subscribe to update new videos. Subscribe To Update New Lesson: https:www.youtube.comVideoLearnEnglish
252,824 views | Oct 18, 2013
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5 conversation phrasal verbs you need to know

http:www.engvid.com These 5 phrasal verbs are used every day by native speakers to help them "catch up" with friends and "work out" problems at home and work. Study this video and you won't ever feel cut off in a conversation. Take a quiz on this lesson here: http:www.engvid.com5-conversation-phrasal-verbsTRANSCRIPTOkay, James. Product placement right about now. Apple Computers, take one. Hi. James from EngVid. Yeah. We're getting sponsored by Apple. "Sponsored" means someone is paying you to do something. No, it's not the case. And just so you know, this is the cheap version that's old. One of you guys made a guess last time I held it up. You're like, "It's the Apple 5 with retinal scan!" I don't even know what that is, so don't ask me. Okay? So -- but Mr. E and I, we get to work on my computer, and we're going to tell a story. Mr. E, ready? Okay. So "Mr. E helped to blank blank my new computer. It's not new. It something something well, and we finished early. However, it something something Mr. E had forgotten to pay his electric bill, so the power was something something -- wow, a lot of 'something somethings'. We sat in the -- excuse me. We sat in the dark" -- stop. The end. This is a stupid story. I'm going to try and do a better story. Mr. E, help me, okay? Now, Mr. E -- first of all, I should tell you what this is about. I'm giving you five phrasal verbs that are commonly used in conversation that will help you have, you know, a more interesting conversation, but not just that. Because these are used commonly in conversation, you can understand what people are saying because I'm going to try and teach you not just one --no sirree Bob! We're having a sale today. James's sale -- you're going to get two for the price of one meaning, so you can understand this story, but when you're done, you can go back and actually build your own stories or usages, okay? So let's go to the beginning."Mr. E helped me to something at my new computer." Well laptops are different. You just put it in a room. In the old days and even now, some people buy big computers, and they have speakers and they have the box and, you know, the big screen. And you have to put it somewhere. Well, when you put it somewhere, you know, you want to arrange or build a system. We call that a "set up". You set it up. It means to put it or arrange it in a way you can use it. You "set up" a business, right? It's a system, you know. You know you buy; you sell -- it's a system. So setting something up is to arrange it or organize it or build a thing that you can use. That's one definition, "set up". What's the second one?" To place somebody in an awkward situation". Interesting. Sometimes you're watching the movies -- I'm sure you watch many of them -- someone will say, "He set me up that so-and-so." Well, what it means is they knew something about the person; they pretended they didn't know; then, they got other people to come around to expose or get the truth out. That's called a "setup". The police "set up" criminals all the time, right? They pretend to buy drugs. They pretend, but they don't actually want to buy them. The criminal sells them, and then they catch them. And they say, "It was a setup from the beginning", and the police go, "Yeah, and you fell for it." When you "fall" for something, you believe it's true even though it's not, okay? So "set up" here means two things: to arrange a system; that's one thing, and that's what we did with my computer system. It's not an awkward situation. We've arranged and built a system, right? So let's set up. Let's go back. Mr. E helped me to set up my new computer. That means we put it on a table, got the speakers, plugged it in, made it work. Cool, right? Next, "It w___ o___ well and we finished early." "W___ o___ well" -- what could that be? W-o, w-o. Well, look. See this other arrow comes down here. What does that mean? Well, it means fix a problem -- or couples fix a relationship -- and come to a successful end. Well, what we're talking about is work because when you have a problem you must work, right? To come to a successful end means you must do some work first to come to the end. Running a race; making dinner; fixing a problem. Fixing a problem requires work. Couples have to work on a relationship. And we also have this "this worked out". And if you're like Arnold Schwarzenegger, you have big muscles because you work out. That's my best Arnold impersonation. Okay, so Arnold works out, but that's different. So we also say -- and I should've put it here -- "go to gym", right? Because a lot of times I hear foreign students say, "Teacher, we go exercising now." And I always go, "[laugh] You go exercise. Right." North Americans, English speakers, they "work out". That's what we do when we go to the gym. It is exercising, but that's our word. Be here we say, "It worked out well".
160,731 views | Oct 12, 2013
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The Secret to Remembering Vocabulary

http:www.engvid.com OMG, there are too many English words to learn! Well, I can help. Watch this video to learn my own trick for remembering new words. In order to show you how this trick works, I will also teach you the following five words: hammered, creamed, bald, beard, and condo. After watching this video, remembering new words will be a piece of cake. Take the quiz here: http:www.engvid.comthe-secret-to-remembering-vocabularyHello. My name is Emma, and in today's video, I will teach you a trick on how to remember vocabulary. So English has the largest vocabulary out of any language. I think it's close to 600,000 words in English. So how are you going to remember so much vocabulary? Well, when I was in China, I created a little trick -- and other people use this trick, too -- that really helped me to remember all the new words I was learning. So in this video, I will teach you this trick. So what you do -- I have a bunch of interesting pictures on the board -- is any time you come up across a new word and you're learning a new word, you need to make a picture in your head of this word. A good idea is to try to think of other words that sound like this word and imagine funny situations in your mind. So what do I mean by that? Well, let me show you.The first word I'm going to teach you today is "bald", "bald", b-a-l-d. What does it mean to be "bald"? It means to have no hair, okay? So if you have no hair, you are "bald". How do you remember this word? Well, if you use my trick, you can imagine a word that sounds like "bald" -- maybe "ball", basketball, soccer ball. So in your mind, I want you to imagine a ball. It can be a basketball, a soccer ball -- any type of ball. Now, imagine the ball with a face. Imagine the ball with no hair on top, maybe a little hair on the side, a little hair here, but no hair on the top. Because "ball" and "bald" sound alike, if you imagine this picture for maybe ten seconds, it will help you to remember it in the future, okay? Think "ball with no hair". Okay.Let's try our second word: "beard". What's a beard? It's the hair that comes off a man's chin -- usually, women don't have beards. So it's the hair that comes down like this. How are we going to remember this word? Well, imagine a man with a beard, and inside the beard is a bird, a little bird, tweet tweet! And what's it doing in the beard? Why, it's drinking beer. Okay? So this little picture is -- don't know if you can see that, but that is beer. So imagine a bird drinking beer. Those two words together -- beer. This isn't beer; this one is. Imagine "bird" and "beer". Together, if you put the words together, they make "beard". A bird drinking beer in a beard. Can you say that fast? "Bird drinking beer in a beard." So maybe, if you picture this for ten seconds, you will remember this word. Okay.Next word I want to teach you today: "creamed". So what does it mean to be "creamed"? "We creamed you guys." "You guys got creamed." It means someone lost a game very badly. If our team creamed your basketball team, your basketball team lost; our team won. So you don't want to be "creamed". If you get "creamed", it's bad. It means you lost, you lose. So how can you remember this? Well, imagine someone -- maybe somebody you don't like, somebody you play basketball against or some sport. Imagine throwing a bunch of ice cream and it hits their face -- because the keyword "cream", "ice cream". So if you can imagine ice cream on someone's face, it will help you to remember the word "creamed". So imagine that for ten seconds. So think "ice cream on face", "creamed".
232,606 views | Oct 27, 2013
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At the Airport Learn English Vocabulary

Learn more at http:linguaspectrum.comdo_the_quiz.php?id=80 My pronunciation course is at http:soundsbritish.com Going on a plane trip soon? Likely to be travelling to an English speaking country and landing in an English speaking airport? This could be just the video for you. Learn all about the language of airports. You will find vocabulary about people and places at the airport, about the technical aspects of an airport and about the questions we often ask when flying. The video and exercises also contain phonetics practice.
1,314,946 views | Sep 12, 2009
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Exclamations in English!!!

http:www.engvid.com What a great student you are! How wonderful! In this video, I will teach you about "how" and "what" exclamations such as "How exciting!" "What a cute couple!" Exclamations are very important in conversational English, and will help you to sound more natural in your English. Watch this video to find out more. What a great idea! http:www.engvid.comexclamations-in-englishTRANSCRIPTHello. My name is Emma, and in today's lesson, we will be talking about exclamations: How exciting! So what is an "exclamation"? Well, "How exciting!" is an example of an exclamation. So an "exclamation" is, pretty much, something you say -- so this is used in conversation English, not written -- when you want to show you are surprised about something, okay? "Whoa! What a big car!", for example. You can also use it when you want to emphasize something -- when you want to show you really mean something. So for example, yesterday, my grandmother gave me this beautiful ring. So what did I say when I got the ring? I said, "What a beautiful ring, Nanny!" I call my grandma "Nanny". I also said, "How beautiful!" These are examples of exclamations. So we use them a lot in conversation. So let's look at how you make an exclamation. Okay, so first, we will look at "how". We make a "how" exclamation by taking "How + an adjective!" If you remember, an "adjective" is something that describes a noun. Example: exciting, interesting, big, small, medium, beautiful, pretty, cool. These are all adjectives. So for example, "How exciting!" -- this is an exclamation. And do you notice what is at the end of this sentence? That's right. An exclamation mark. So maybe you're talking to your friend; they're telling you about their job; what's their job? Maybe they're an astronaut. They go to space. What would you say to them? You'd say, "How exciting!" Meaning you're very excited for them. "How strange!" So again, "How + adj.!" There is no verb. And we have, again, our exclamation mark. "How strange!" Maybe you would say this if you saw a haunted house or a weird man or you saw someone doing something very strange. You would say, "How strange!" Another example: Maybe you see a baby. Your friend just had a baby. You're looking at it. It has these nice, big eyes. What do you say? "How cute!" I always say this when I see puppies and kittens. "How cute!" Okay, so again, no verb, and if you write it, it has an exclamation mark. Okay. So these are our "how" exclamations. Let's look at our "what" exclamations. It's on this side. It's the same idea. We use this when we're showing surprise, or we really want to show we mean something. So the formula -- it's like math: We take "What + a + adj. +noun!" So let's isolate this. "What + a + adjective + noun + !" So what are some examples of this? If I saw a movie -- I really liked this movie. Maybe it's an action movie. At the end, I might say, "Wow! What an exciting movie!" Okay? "Exciting" is your adjective; "movie" is your noun. In this case, there is no verb, but you have to be careful. You must remember "a" or "an". Okay? So it's either "what a", "what an". Let's look at another example: "What a strange man." Okay, so again, maybe you see a man doing something very strange or you meet someone; you think they're very strange. "Oh, what a strange man!" Again: "What + a + adjective is 'strange' + noun is 'man'". Okay? Another example: "Oh, what a cute baby!" "What a cute baby!" And again, what is your adjective? Cute. What is the noun? Baby. Is there a verb? No. Is there an exclamation mark? Yes. That's the exclamation mark. Okay. So these are some examples of exclamations, but there's another way to do this. So we have with "how". Maybe you have a sentence: "She is pretty." "Oh, she's very pretty." "She is pretty." You can say this a different way. Especially in conversation. You can say, "How pretty she is." So it's just like what we did up here, but we are adding the subject and the verb. And notice the order: "How pretty she -- so subject first -- is -- verb last." Okay? "How exciting the movie was!" "How strange the man is!" "How cute the babies are!" Here are some more examples of this. Now, we can do something similar with "what" exclamations. This sentence: "You have big eyes." There's a very famous story called "The Three Little Pigs" -- or no. Not "Three Little Pigs", "Little Red Riding Hood". And there's a very famous line in that story -- it's a kids' story -- where the wolf is dressed in Grandmother's clothes, and Red Riding Hood says to the wolf: "Grandma, what big eyes do you have!" Oh, actually, "What big eyes you have!" There's no "do"! "What big eyes you have!" "What big lips you have!" "What big teeth you have!" Okay? So that's from a very famous story. So it's just like what we did up here. You have "What" -- you don't have "a", but "What + adjective + noun + subject + verb". We could say also, "What an exciting movie this is!" "What a strange man he is!"
92,174 views | Dec 09, 2013
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What the hell is Halloween?

http:www.engvid.com Why am I dressed like a frog? Watch this video and find out! Halloween is a very very old tradition that dates back to a group of people called Celts. What is "trick or treating"? Why are people buying pumpkins and not eating them? Learn the answers to these questions and more! http:www.engvid.comwhat-the-hell-is-halloweenTRANSCRIPTWelcome to the Halloween lesson. My name is Jack, Jack-O'-Lantern. Do you want to find out about me? Hello. It's Halloween -- my favorite time of the year. I'm dressed like a frog. This is my costume, not my natural attire for teaching at EngVid. My name is Ronnie. I'm a frog today. I'm going to teach you about my favorite holiday: Halloween. You might be asking yourself, "What the hell is 'Halloween'? And why is Ronnie wearing a frog costume? What is she doing?" Phew! That's hot. So what I'm going to go through is what we do in Canada and in America for Halloween.The first thing -- and the most exciting thing -- that we do when we're children is we go trick or treating. So we wear a costume like this. Any costume you want, you can wear. A lot of little girls like to be princesses or witches. It's really, really up to you. It's your imagination -- let your imagination run wild. You can choose any costume you would like. So what we do is we dress up in costumes and we go around our neighborhood to our houses that live -- to the people that live around us, and we ring their doorbells, and we go, "Trick or treat!" And the lovely people give us candy for free. We don't have to do anything. You don't have to pay them money. They just give you free candy. As a child, I loved this, as you can imagine. Little Ronnie going to houses, "Trick or treat! Give me candy." So "trick or treat" -- "trick" means, like, a joke. And "treat" means like a snack or candy. A long, long, long, long time ago, this actually had a meaning, but we'll get to that later.As I've written down on the board too, we wear costumes -- anything you want. Some people spend a lot of money on their costumes. I got mine in Japan, in Hokkaido. I think it was $12, my frog costume. We wear costumes because it's fun to be another person. Usually, trick or treating is only for children because when we get to a certain age, we can buy our own candy -- buy your own candy. Get a job, okay? And when we get older, we still wear costumes. It's fun. We usually go to a Halloween party. People dress up, drink a lot, have fun. This thing, this guy right here -- it's not a pumpkin. This is a pumpkin. A "pumpkin" is a fruit, and it's orange or it can be green, and we usually eat it, but Jack-O'-Lanterns are very different. A Jack-O'-Lantern actually has carvings into the pumpkin. "What a strange thing that you guys do, isn't it?" Jack-O'-Lantern is a pumpkin with a face in it. So Jack-O'-Lantern has a face, and it's actually a pumpkin."Trick or treat! Smell my feet! Give me something good to eat!" Is what we used to say. Let's go back in history. "Why? What is this? What are you doing here?" We have -- 2000 years ago, the Celtic people -- now, these are people that lived in Ireland and Scotland and the north of France -- they had a belief -- it's getting hot in here, guys -- that on October 31st, which is actually called "All Hallows' Eve", that dead people returned to earth. Now, I know if you are from Japan, you have a holiday called "Obon". I'm not really good with the pronunciation. You believe that your ancestors come back to earth and visit you. In Mexico -- arriba! What up? -- you guys have "Day of the Dead". Again, you believe that the dead come back to the earth. This is the exact same thing, except in North America, we have made it so that we get candy -- same idea.So the pronunciation of this word -- Ah! Jeeze! Yeah. There's been some controversy of it. Because it is a Celtic word -- it looks like it should be "Samhaiam" -- but it's actually "Sah wvin". Now, there's been some debate on is it Scottish Gaelic? Is it Gaelic? I honestly do not speak Gaelic, obviously, and I've just looked on the Internet -- apparently, it's called "Sah wvin". Sometimes it's called "So wvin" -- I don't know. Just call it Halloween, okay? So 2000 years ago, people believed that dead people returned to the earth. Some of these people were good people, but some of the people were evil, bad people. So what they would do is they would wear animal skin -- like a frog -- costumes to disguise themselves so that the evil spirits didn't take their souls. So the costumes come from people actually wearing animal skins to disguise themselves. So we've stolen this, but unfortunately, we've made our costumes cute or sexy. "Hey, look! I'm a sexy pirate." Good. Why don't you be a pirate with one eye that eats people, okay? Then we have trick or treat. Trick or treat happened probably after this, and a long story short, people would go to other people's houses, and they would pray for their ancestors.
92,306 views | Oct 29, 2013
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Thanksgiving What is it?

http:www.engvid.com At Thanksgiving, people in North America eat turkey... but why? What do they celebrate? Learn about a North American hoilday that has different dates and customs in the USA and Canada. http:www.engvid.comthanksgiving
112,263 views | Nov 12, 2013
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