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Conversation Skills Giving your opinion

From Youtube.com - Posted: Oct 20, 2013 - 1,375,559 viewsGame | Conversation Skills Giving your opinion | Conversation Skills Giving your opinion
Conversation Skills Giving your opinion
Conversation Skills Giving your opinion
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http:www.engvid.com If someone asks you your opinion, don't say "so-so", or maybe. Tell the person how you feel. In this lesson, learn how to give your opinion! Don't be shy! http:www.engvid.comconversation-skills-giving-your-opinionTRANSCRIPTHello. Welcome to the lesson of giving your opinion. My name is Ronnie. Do me a favor. Go to YouTube. Go to my page, EnglishLessons4U, and subscribe to my channel. Watch out for imitators. I'm the real deal. Be careful. I'm going to teach you guys how to give your opinion. Now, you might think, "Ronnie, I already know how to give my opinion." If someone says, "Hey, do you like pizza?" And I say, "It's so-so." Your opinion is "so-so"? Guess what, that's a really bad answer. So I want to teach you some techniques to continue a conversation when you have to give your opinion. This happens all the time. Maybe you went to a new restaurant or you saw a movie or you went to a new pub or bar or restaurant and you want to tell people, "Oh, my god, it was great! I went to the new restaurant that opened up." And your friend says, "How was it?" And you say, "Okay." What kind of answer is "okay"? Was it good? Was it bad? Did you get diarrhea? Did you like it? What did you eat? So when someone asks you your opinion, instead of giving short, one-word answers -- "Yes." "I liked it." "It was great." -- you need to expand, and you need to give more information. Here is a list of things that you should not say when someone asks your opinion. -"So? How was the movie?" -"So-so." What the hell does "so-so" mean? "So" means "yes" and "no" at the same time? If someone said to me, "It's so-so", I think it's bad. Don't say that. Maybe your friend and you saw the same movie, and someone asks your friend, "Hey, how was the movie?" Your friend said, "Well, it was a little boring, and there wasn't a lot of action. I didn't really like it that much." The conversation naturally would go to you, and you'd go, "Same." Same what? Please don't do this. It's so frustrating when you're trying to have a conversation with someone. Don't say "same". You are an individual. Please give the person your opinion. You can say something like, "Well, I agree. It was boring, but..." -- add your own spice of life; add your own opinion. So instead of saying "same", you can say, "I agree", and then add your information. The next one. Now, if you're a little shy, and someone offers you something, for example, "Would you like to have free English lessons?" "Sure" is a good answer. But if you're giving your opinion, for example, "Did you like the new restaurant that you went to last night?" "Sure." "Sure" is a really, really bad answer. What, again, you want to do is expand in your answer. This is the worst thing you can say if someone asks you your opinion or if they ask you a question about something. As an example, someone might say, -"Ronnie, are you from Canada?" -"Of course." "Well, excuse me for asking." You only are going to use "of course" if someone has asked you a very, very stupid question or a question that they already know the answer to. As an example, you could say, "Ronnie, you're from Canada. Do you have red hair?" And I'd say, "Of course I do. You can see it." So when you answer "of course", it does not mean the same as "yes". "Of course" is a very, very rude way to answer someone's question if they ask you something. So please be very careful of this. "Are you enjoying your English lessons?" "Of course!" Good answer. "Maybe." "Do you like Ronnie, teacher?" "Maybe." Maybe? What does "maybe" mean? So "maybe", "sure ", "same", "so-so" -- garbage. Don't use them. "Maybe" -- are you not going to tell me the answer? Is it a secret? Don't say "maybe". Another one that a lot of you guys say is unnecessary unless you want to exaggerate something. So let's say, again, that you went to a new pizza shop, and you ordered some really spicy pasta -- at a pizza store. That's okay. So you get the pizza or the pasta; it's really spicy, and you eat it, and your friend goes, "Hey how's your spicy pasta?" You're going to say, "It's spicy." You do not need to say, "It's spicy for me" because you are the one talking. So you can just say, "It's spicy." Now, the way that we would use this correctly is to exaggerate something. Example: If you're having pasta that's really, really spicy, and your friend is having the same pasta dish, maybe your friend is eating it and goes, "This is not spicy for me." You're exaggerating that one is spicy and one isn't. So you're eating it; you're dying; you're crying; your face is turning red; you say, "God, this is spicy." Your friend's, like, "This isn't spicy for me." So you're exaggerating your point. Be careful about this one.So these ones: Don't use them. This one: Only if you're exaggerating a point. These -- are the good ones. These are the good guys. These ones don't exist anymore.

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If you are shy, you NEED to watch this! Shy people have a hard time talking in social situations. I used to be shy too, but look at me now! In today's lesson, I'll teach you to overcome your shyness! First, I will help you understand the reasons that you are shy. Then, I'll give you lots of tips on how to start a conversation. Click on today's lesson -- don't be shy! http:www.engvid.comconversation-skills-dont-be-shyTRANSCRIPTHi, there. My name is Ronnie. Today, I'm going to teach you something very fun and exciting and important. It's how to improve your speaking. Whether you're speaking English or whether you're doing public speaking in front of people or whether you're just speaking to a neighbor, someone on the bus, someone in a store, or a taxi driver, you might be shy. What does "shy" mean? "Shy" means you don't like -- or you're nervous -- to speak to strangers or to speak to other people. So if you are naturally a shy person, I'm sure you've heard people over and over again say, "Don't be shy! Come on. Don't be shy!" Easier said than done, isn't it, shy people? So I want to give you some tips or some pointers maybe to help you to be less shy. It's impossible to be 100 percent outgoing if you are naturally a shy person.So today's lesson is how you improve your speaking. Don't be shy!The first thing that you have to do is think about why. "Why am I shy?" There may be many different reasons. I'm just going to go through a couple of them. The number one reason, probably, if you're watching these videos, is because you are trying to speak a new language. Maybe it is English. And you are shy to make a mistake. You don't want to say something bad, funny, rude, embarrassing. You don't want your face to go red and they'll go, "Ha ha! You said a funny word!" Okay. That will happen. And you know what? Who cares? It happens all the time. I say funny things a lot, too.Another reason why you may be shy is because you "talk funny". Lots of people have different problems with their mouths. Some people have a speech impediment. Some people have a lisp, so they don't pronounce words probably like me. Maybe you have a very strange or different accent than the other people around you. People often ask me, "Ronnie, where are you from?" And I say, "Canada." And they say, "No, you're not." "Yes, I am." "But you have an accent." "Yes. I have an accent. I talk funny. Who cares? I'm from Canada. Nice to meet you." So even if you do talk funny or you do have an accent, rock with it. Yeah. You speak differently. Good. Don't be like other people. Other people are boring.This is a problem. Maybe you just don't like to talk. Okay? Maybe you are quiet. Maybe you don't want to talk to anyone ever, at all. That's cool. If you don't like people and you don't like to talk, don't force yourself to talk. Maybe you could write something. Maybe you could text message or email someone. But that's not going to improve your speaking. If you do not like to talk to people, that's your choice. But I'm trying to help you overcome your shyness. So let's go through a couple ways to actually do this. Don't be shy!Just say, "Hi!" So if you're standing at a bus stop or the subway station or anywhere, and there's another human being beside you -- let's say that you're at a bar, and there's a beautiful girl or a very handsome boy. The quickest, the easiest, and the best way to speak to someone is just to say, "Hi! My name is Ronnie." Don't use "Ronnie", though. That's my name. You have to use your name. So just say "hi" to people. If they want to speak to you, they will start the conversation. They will say, "Oh, hi. My name is --. Nice to meet you." "Oh, nice to meet you, too." Uh-oh! And then, your shyness sets in because -- "What do I say? Shoes. I have shoes. Do you have shoes? Oh, God. I'm such an idiot. I can't even speak." Maybe the other person will have asked you a person. You can always ask people basic questions, like, "Where are you from? Why do you talk funny? Why are you shy?" All those fun questions.When you're actually speaking to someone, it's really important that you choose a topic that you like. So if I were to meet someone -- "Hi. My name is Ronnie." "Hi." "Cool. So -- oh, I like music. Do you like the Sex Pistols?" "Yeah." "Me, too. Oh, my God. No way! What other kind of music to you like?" So I like to talk to people about music. The only problem is not a lot of people like the same music I do. So you have to choose a topic that you like to talk about. If you're lucky, the other person will also like the topic.The next one: Get a job. Now, this might be very strange for you to even comprehend, but I -- right here -- am shy.
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http:www.engvid.com I exited the building = very strange English! I shall teach you = very old-fashioned English! I joined the BBQ = WHAT??? Exit, shall, and join are all old words, and are considered too formal nowadays! Learn how to use more natural words and expressions! Don't forget to take the quiz: http:www.engvid.comold-school-vocabularyTRANSCRIPTHello, and welcome to my lesson. I hope you are happy. What? What's going on? Today, I'm going to teach you some words that you will say in English. They are definitely English words. You will use the words correctly in a beautiful, grammatically correct sentence, but they make me go, "What? That's weird. That's weird. "You speak like a grandmother or a grandfather." This lesson is called "Olde School" or -- uh-oh! "Too formal! What are you doing?" So one of the goals that I've always had since I started teaching ESL, or teaching English, is that textbook English and the way that a lot of people teach you how to speak... it's not "cool". You sound like you are reading a textbook. One of my goals in life is to make everyone that I teach sound natural, normal, and not like an old person even if you are an old person. That's cool. I want you to learn words that I and other normal -- normal? Not normal -- and natural English speakers would use. So "Olde School". "Ronnie, you've spelled "old school" wrong." Guess what? A long time ago, this is how they spelled "old", but they didn't say "oldie", they said "old". "Olde school" "Olde school" means it's old. So let's look at the first one: "Telephone". We never, ever, ever, ever, ever say "telephone"; we say "phone" or "mobile" or "cell". "Telephone" is really, really, really old. Do you remember the really old telephones that you had to dial -- you stick your finger and you go [makes clicking sounds]? And if you made a mistake, you had to start again. I remember being a little Ronnie, and I had to dial my best friend's number, and it had three nines in it. [Shudders] "I made a mistake." So "telephone" -- old. Now we have these wonderful cell phones. You press a button, and your friend is right there -- "Hi", okay? Don't use the word "telephone"; it's strange. The other one is: "Television". Do you have a television? I don't. I hate television. So much so that I don't even call it that; I call it a TV. Please call it a "TV", not a "television". "Television" is old, very old. This word: "refrigerator" -- "Ronnie, there's a space here." Yeah. Ronnie has trouble spelling. And the reason why I have trouble spelling this word is we never, ever, ever say this word: "refrigerator". I'm tired by the time I get to this space here, so instead of saying "refrigerator", do you know what we say? "I'm hungry. I'm going to go to the fridge." and get a Coke or a drink. So normally, we shorten this, and we call it a "fridge", "fridge". "Automobile", "auto". If you speak any of the Latin languages, you can understand "auto" means "self"; "mobile" means "move". "Look at me. I'm going in my self-move to the -- to the mall. Would you like a drive?" "No. I'll take the bus, thank you." So "automobile" and "auto", we do not use. We call it one of these [makes car noise] a "car". I have seen a textbook -- one or two in my day -- and it actually says "automobile". So I looked at the date: "Published 2010." Really? You put "automobile" in a textbook? Give your head a shake. The next one is a modal verb. If you do not know what a modal verb is, go look in a grammar book. "Shall" is a modal verb. However, we never use this. The only time you will see this modal verb used is if you are reading rules of something. If you go to a public swimming pool, or if you go on the subway, all of the rules are written with this word. "You shall not spit in the pool. You shall not -- in the pool." Okay, I'm not going to do that. "You shall not run around the pool because you're going to die." "Shall" -- we always use "will" or negative "won't". This has... replaced our modal verb "shall". Please don't say this; it's weird. "You shall give me a dollar." What? "You will give me a dollar." "You're going to give me a dollar." Everyone give me a dollar. The next one is an expression: "What a pity" or "What a shame!" Now, if you were -- let's see -- maybe a 70-year-old grandmother or grandfather living in England, you would say this all the time. My grandmother -- God rest her soul -- would say this, "What a pity. What a shame." She's from Scotland. She says this all the time, "What a pity. What a shame." We go, "That sucks." Okay? If something is bad, you can -- you can say that. You can say, "Wow. That sucks." or "That blows." Don't say this. You can even say, "That's bad." "What a pity" or "What a shame" -- it's way, way too old. Too old. Too old. Bye-bye. "Pardon me!" Pardon me; I forgot the "S". "Pardon me" -- again, my grandmother says this all the time. Pardon me -- we say now: "Excuse me."
4,802 views | Sep 19, 2013
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http:www.engvid.com "I'm going to home" or I'm going to home"? "I'm going to school" or "I'm going to school?" Why do we use 'to' with some words and not with others? In this English grammar class, I'll teach you many words that don't go with 'to'. This is a mistake that sounds bad to native speakers, so try to learn these words and stop making this mistake! Go here to take a quiz on this lesson: http:www.engvid.comwhen-not-to-use-toTRANSCRIPT"Are you going to home?" "Are you going home?" "Where are you going?" "What are you doing?" You're watching a video. My name's Ronnie. I'm going to teach you one trick. Finally, you will understand why in English, we say "I'm going to school" or "I'm going to work." But when we talk about our beautiful, warm, and cozy home we don't say "to". Why, why, why, I don't know. It's just English, isn't it? I can give you some clues. I'll give you some words. You will get this right away. It will be easy for you to do. So if you look at this sentence, "Are you going home?" A very, very big mistake that everyone says will be, "Are you going to home?" And I go, "No, no 'to'. Don't say 'to'. Don't say 'to', no!" Okay, okay, okay, "Are you going home?" Yes, don't say "to", but why? You learned that when you are going someplace, you say "to". For example, "Are you going to bed?" We don't say "to the bed", by the way. We just say bed. "Are you going to bed?" "Are you going to work?" Or you can use the past tense, "Did you go to work?" "Did you go to school?" "Did you go to engvid.com today, and check out a new lesson?" But when you say "home", you do not use "to". So you know the rule, maybe that this is a noun. This is a noun, so when you use going to a place which is a noun, you have to say "to", and then you come along, and you find this beautiful home, and Ronnie freaks out, because you say "to" and then you don't understand why. I don't know but I will give you a list of words that are places. But all of these words on this board, you cannot use with "to". So "are you going abroad?" You cannot ask someone, "Are you going to abroad?" If you look in the dictionary; the dictionary, one of those books. If you look at an online dictionary it'll tell you that these are adverbs of location, whereas the other ones you've learned are nouns. But hold on, "home" is a noun. Home is just this big exception going, "No, I am a noun. I don't want to have "to". All of these ones are not proper nouns, they're adverbs of location. Let's go through underground, underneath the surface of the land. If you have ever been to London, there's a big system called the Tube. It's also called the "underground". Most places in the world call it the "underground". In Canada, we call it the subway -- "sub" means "under". So you can say, "I'm going underground. I'm going underground." If you know The Jam -- "Wow, what an amazing band, Ronnie," I know. You will know this song called "I'm Going Underground." Maybe by the magic of video, we'll put on that video for you. "I'm going underground." "I'm going downtown," or you can say "uptown". I would just sing songs for everything, "Uptown Girls" -- little bit of Billy Joel for you. Uptown, downtown -- you don't need the "to". There, here, anywhere, nowhere, somewhere -- you don't need "to". In, inside, out, outside, upstairs, downstairs don't use "to". They're not nouns. They're places. One other thing to be very careful about, please, when you say this you want to say "upstairs" and "downstairs." Too many times I hear people say, "I went down-stair." Only one, just one stair, I made it. "I went up-stair." And then what did you do? You just stood there? Wow, don't say "down-stair, up-stair". Please use all of the stairs. Go up, okay? That'll be fun, more exciting. You can fall down the stairs too, that's fun. But again, we don't say "to". "I'm going downstairs." "I'm coming upstairs." If you are confused, or if you have ever been confused about when to use "to", the only advice I can give you is please remember this list of words. Once you have remembered this list, you'll go, "Oh that was easy." [That was easy.]" Yes, it was. Thank you, goodbye.
1,544 views | Jul 19, 2013
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game | Learn English What we call the people we love ❤❤❤

Learn English What we call the people we love ❤❤❤

What do you call your boyfriend or girlfriend? Maybe you say "baby", "honey", "sweetheart", "sexy", or something else? In this lesson, I will provide you with a lot of inspiration for cute nicknames for your loved ones, guaranteed to make their hearts melt!!! WARNING: These terms are NOT to be used with strangers! After watching the video and doing the quiz at https:www.engvid.comwhat-we-call-the-people-we-love ,and leave a comment telling me your favorite terms of endearment.TRANSCRIPTWelcome, darlings, to the lesson. How are you? Do you like my new wardrobe? Today I'm going to teach you about things or names that you can call your partner, your honey-bunch, your significant other. Rainier, Sonja, this one's for you guys. How are ya? So these are words that we use in English to talk about the one that we love or the one that we love for the moment. In English they're called terms of endearment. It has nothing to do with deers. But, they are terms of endearment.So, probably the most common ones are things like, as I said to you: "darling". Now, sometimes we say: "darling". One word of caution, ladies and gentlemen: These are for people that you know. So, for example, if you're in a restaurant, please do not call the waitress: "babe", or "honey", or "sweetheart". It is degrading. It is not cool. Women don't like it. If you know the person, if it's your baby, your mom, your dad-that's weird-your child, your boyfriend, your girlfriend, your other boyfriend, your other girlfriend, your dog, your cat, someone who is close to you - please, use these. But if this is a stranger, do not use these. Women, especially, do not appreciate being called these names. We find it insulting because I am not your sugarpie, darling. Unless you want a smack in the face, I'm not your sugarpie. Okay? So be careful. Say these to people you love and know.So, one thing that's come up that I didn't know that I found out when I was researching this is back in the... A long time ago in the 2000s or the 1990s, it was popular in rap songs to say: "My boo". And I thought: "That's funny, that's what ghosts say." But it actually is probably just people who can't say friend properly-Americans-it comes from the French: "beau". So in the French language they have the word "beau", which means boyfriend or girlfriend, but I guess Americans just say "boo". Honey Boo Boo, oh god, the horror. So, Honey Boo Boo is a really famous little girl, and her name has two names... Terms of endearment together, Honey Boo Boo, you darling. So, "boo" is the French bastardization of "beau". So, use at will.We make these names by talking about sweet things. For example: "honey", honey is sweet. Most of these names are older, so that's why we're using kind of older things. So, you can just call someone your honey, but then we can have: "honey-pie", "honey-bun", "honey-bunny", "honey-baby". I think Elvis did this a lot. Then we can be "sweet" something, so: "sweet-pea", "sweet-cheeks". Cheeks are here and they're also your bum. "Sweet-thing", but I think you should be like: "sweet-thang", you should say it like that. Then we have: "sweetie" or "sweetiepie". I don't know why, but a lot of these have to do with pie. I guess back when they were making these words, they liked pie, and that's all they had. "Sweetheart", this is pretty common. You have: "pumpkin" or "pumpkinpie". Again, it's the pie. A pumpkin is a big, orange fruit or a veggie, I guess it's really cute. And: "sugar" or again "sugar-pie".Again, I can't stress enough that you cannot just say these to people that you don't know, you don't have a relationship with. Be very careful who you say these to because you can use them sarcastically. So, for example, Mel Gibson called a cop or a police officer "sugar-tits". I don't think that the cop really enjoyed that, and Mel Gibson in a movie was arrested. So, "sugar-tits", maybe a term of endearment, but be careful how you use it. You don't want to get arrested, go to jail. We can also use this, for example, if I am speaking to another girl and I'm trying to kind of be sarcastic with her, I can say, like: "Okay, honey." So the way that we use it, the intonation that we say it, especially to a stranger, it has a completely different meaning. So, please, again, be careful. We also have things like: "cutie" or "cutiepie", "angel", "apricot". My chiropractor always calls me "apricot", and I'm like: "I'm not an apricot, sir. I'm a person." And: "doll". Now, this is a very, very old expression. You hear it or see it in movies: "a doll" or "dollface". Again, outdated, we don't use it as much.More common ones are: "hottie" or "hot stuff". Hot stuff, baby, oh yeah. They use that in a commercial now. Then we have just names that are silly, like: "snookums", or "snooky". I think Snooki was one of the characters in that terrible television show. "Snuggles" and one of my mom's favourites: "pet".
1,918 views | Mar 13, 2017
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game | 3 tips for sounding like a native speaker

3 tips for sounding like a native speaker

"That'll be 66 cents please." "Sikysi... what?" Having a hard time understanding native speed English? This lesson will give you some tips on how to sound like a native speaker as well as how to understand what you hear by breaking down expressions into their individual word and sounds. https:www.engvid.com3-tips-for-sounding-like-a-native-speakerTRANSCRIPTHi again, welcome back to www.engvid.com. I'm Adam. Today, I'm going to help you sound a little bit more like a native speaker, hopefully. Students ask me all the time: "How can I sound like a native speaker?" Well, before I say anything, let me just tell you that it will take time and a lot, a lot, a lot of practice. The best way is to live in an English-speaking country, of course, but of course you can do it anywhere, but it takes time; be patient, practice, practice, practice. So we're looking at pronunciation. Let me start with this word: "pronunciation". Not: "pronounciation". It is not a pronoun. A pronoun is: "I", "me", "my", "mine". Pronunciation is how we speak English. So I'm going to give you three tips that will help you sound a little bit more like a native speaker. We're going to start with connecting words. Now, think about your own language, whether you're speaking Spanish or Polish or Chinese, you do this in your language as well. When you're speaking fast, you're taking words and you're squeezing them together; you're connecting them, so one word flows into the next word. That's what we're going to do here. You can connect consonants to consonants. What this means: when a word ends in a consonant... A consonant is "b", "c", "d", "f", "g", etc. A vowel is "a", "e", "i", "o", "u". When a word ends in a consonant and the next word begins with the same consonant, drop the first one. So for example: we do not say: "black coffee", we don't say: "ke, ke". There's only one "k": "bla coffee", "bla coffee." Okay? Practice that. Now, "t" and "d", these are two different consonants, but according to the tongue and the mouth, they almost sound the same so we do the same thing. "Wha do you do?", "Wha do you do?" But again, another thing you have to keep in mind is when we say it fast, we also don't really say "e", we say like a... Sort of like a small... We don't say "o" - sorry -, we say sort of a small "e". "Wha do ye do?" Practice that. "Wha do ye do?" Strange, huh? No "t", "wha", "de ye do?", "Wha de ye do?" That's how a native speaker would say it naturally. Now, another thing is when a word ends in a consonant and the next word begins in a vowel, make sure you roll it in. Right? Roll the consonant into the vowel and separate the syllable before. A syllable is the vowel sounds in a word. Okay? So nobody, like native speakers don't say: "Not at all. Oh no, not at all." We don't say it like that. We say: "Oh, not-at-all.", "Not-at-all.", "Not-at-all." Right? The "t", so this becomes: "No-ta-tall", "No-ta-tall", "Not at all". Okay? Say it quickly, blend the letters one into the next. But again, practice it.Now, for those of you who are going to be taking a test, an English test that involves listening; IELTS, TOEFL, TOEIC, if you're in Canada you're maybe doing a CELPIP test. Okay? This is going to help you on the listening section as well. This is one of the things they're testing. Somebody on the recording will say: "Not-at-all", and you need to cut: "Not at all", you need to understand the separate words, that's part of the test. So practice speaking it, practice listening to it. Another thing we do is we squeeze some words. Okay? Certain words, we don't say all the syllables, we don't even say all the letters. I've heard many students say: "Com-fort-able", "com-fort-able", but native speakers, we don't say this part, we don't say the "or". We say: "Comf-ta-bil", and notice the last sound is like a small tiny, tiny little "i" in there. "Comftabil", "comf-ta-bil", "comftabil". Okay? We don't pronounce the "or": "Comfortable". Nope, don't do that.Another word like that: "Interesting". "In-chre-sting". Find out what the syllables are so: "In-ter" - sorry, my mistake -, "In-ter-rest-ing". If you want to emphasize something, we have a word called: "enunciate". When someone wants to emphasize a word, then they enunciate each syllable; they say each syllable separately. "Oh, that is very in-ter-est-ing." Right? Because I want you to understand that the word is interesting, but in every day speech: "Intresting", "in-tre-sting". "In-ter-est-ing", I have four syllables, when I actually say it naturally, it becomes three syllables and the "t" and the "r" become like a "ch", but that's... We'll talk about that next. Another word: "every". "E-vry". I don't say: "Ev-er-y", I don't say this letter "e", "ev-er-y". "E-vry", "evryone", "evrything", "evry".
4,424 views | Oct 21, 2013
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game | Conversation Skills Learn new words and keep a conversation going!

Conversation Skills Learn new words and keep a conversation going!

http:www.engvid.com Do people sometimes use words in English that you don't understand? Watch this lesson to learn how you can improve your conversation skills and your vocabulary at the same time! Then test yourself with the quiz: http:www.engvid.comconversation-skills-learn-new-words
1,285 views | Nov 26, 2012
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game | How to Remember Vocabulary

How to Remember Vocabulary

http:www.engvid.com Remembering vocabulary is difficult! In this lesson, I'll show you five simple ways to remember new words that you learn. If you follow these suggestions, you WILL improve. Take the quiz on this lesson here: http:www.engvid.comhow-to-remember-vocabulary
4,995 views | Jan 06, 2013
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game | Transportation Vocabulary Phrasal Verbs GET ON, GET OUT OF, RIDE, GO

Transportation Vocabulary Phrasal Verbs GET ON, GET OUT OF, RIDE, GO

http:www.engvid.com I GET OFF a train, bus, or subway. But: I GET OUT OF a car or taxi. I RIDE a bike and a motorcycle. How do you get to work or school? Learn how to use phrasal verbs to talk about transportation, then test yourself on the quiz at http:www.engvid.comtransportation-vocabulary-phrasal-verbsHello. How are you? Today, we're going to learn about getting around. This means taking public transportation or talking about how you got somewhere or how you're going to go somewhere. All of the examples I've written in the past tense because somebody might ask you, "How did you get here?" "What? I flew because I have a magic carpet. That's how. Why?"We have different ways of getting places. Verbs: You can say, "I took a 'bus', a 'train', a 'cab', or a 'taxi'." "Cab" and "taxi" are the same. Or you can take a "plane". So with all of these nouns -- "plane", "cab", "taxi", "train", "bus" -- you're going to use the verb "took". There are no exceptions. You cannot say, "I rode a bus. I rode a train." It's wrong. "Rode" means that you were on top of the bus or on the train doing some bus surfing -- didn't happen.I hear people say this a lot, "How did you get here?" "I ride car." "Wow. What were you doing on top of the car?" If you "ride" something, you're always on top of it. What can you -- what can you ride? I can ride a bicycle. So "ride" literally means you're on top of something. Tell me what you can ride. You can ride a bicycle, a motorcycle, a scooter, a moped. If you're on top of it, you're riding it -- a horse."I go by car." No, no, no. These, unfortunately, are wrong. We don't say, "I go by car" or "I ride car." We say, very easily, past tense of the verb "drive": "drove". "How did you get here?" "I drove." You do not need to say, "I drove by car" because you're not driving a bus; you're not driving an airplane; you're not driving a train. Very simply, you can say, "I drove."Another thing that I hear people say is, "I go by foot." "One foot? You have one foot? Did you hop here the whole time? You must be tired. You go by foot? Wow." Maybe you only have one foot. That's cool. You should drive or take a bus. Another thing: "I walk on foot." This means that you take your hands, and you literally put them underneath your feet and you walk -- if this is your foot -- you walk on your hands. This is painful. I do not recommend this. I would not literally want to walk on my hands. Please don't walk on your feet. Do not walk on your hands. "I walk on your foot" would be, "I'm sorry" -- walk on hands, walk on feet. You'd be stepping on your feet, and you would never get anywhere. You just want to say, "I walked." "How did you get here today, Ronnie?" "I walked."Another thing that's really confusing in English -- and I understand why -- is when to use the phrasal verb "got on" or "got off", and when to say "got in" or "got out". So as an example, we would say, "I got off the train." Let's write that down. Or you can say, "I got on the train." Also, we use this with a bus. So you can say, "I got on the bus" and "I got off the bus." You don't need to use extra words. Like, you don't want to say, "I got off on the bus." You don't want to say, "I got the train off." Unnecessary. Please do not use extra words when you say this. You're just going to say, "I got on" -- the verb -- the noun. Or "I got off", the noun."Train", "bus", and the "plane", or an "airplane". So think about this: What does -- or what do trains, buses, and airplanes have in common? No? Nothing? No? Okay. A train, a bus, or an airplane has many people. You can think of it as something that is public or very large. So a train, a bus, or an airplane, you have to pay. It's really big, and you can fit many people on it. So you're going to get on or get off something that is very big. You're going to get off something that's very big. Or if it's public transportation, you can fit many people.
1,850 views | Dec 13, 2013
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game | 10 WORK Expressions in English

10 WORK Expressions in English

http:www.engvid.com What does it mean to be overworked? Are you a workaholic? Do you easily get worked up over nothing? In this English lesson, I will teach you the following ten expressions with the word work in them: overworked, work someone in, get worked up, workaholic, work out for the best, work on something, dirty work, work it, and the two different meanings of work out. After this video, I hope you work on our quiz to practice these expressions. http:www.engvid.com10-work-expressions-in-englishTRANSCRIPTHello. My name is Emma, and today we are going to learn some work expressions, okay? So these expressions don't necessarily actually have to do with work, but they're expressions that use the word "work". So today, I will teach you ten new expressions. Let's get started. Expression No. 1: "overworked". What does it mean to be "overworked"? If you are "overworked", it means you have too much work, okay? So this is not a happy situation. So you might tell your boss, "Listen. I feel a little overworked." Maybe you complain to your friends on the phone, "Work is so hard. I'm overworked. There's no staff. It's all me. I work, work, work. I'm overworked." So "over" usually means, like, "more". So that's a hint, "overworked". One thing about all of these expressions: Pay careful attention to the preposition because with work expressions, a change in preposition can completely change the meaning of the expression. So that is "overworked". I hope none of you are overworked, and I hope none of you are "underpaid", meaning you're not getting enough money.Our next expression is "dirty work". I really like this expression. So what is "dirty work"? Well, "dirty" is the opposite of "clean", okay? So "dirty" is "no clean" -- "not clean". "Dirty work" is work that is not fun work. No one wants to do dirty work, okay? So it's unpleasant -- see the sad face? -- work. What is an example of dirty work? Well, maybe you work at a company, and maybe there's a co-worker, or maybe you have some staff, and someone wants you to "fire" that staff, meaning someone is not happy with this person's work, so they want this person to be "fired". Instead of them saying "You can't work here now", they will tell you to fire this person. So it's a job you don't want to do, essentially. There are many examples of "dirty work", but what it really is, is a job no one wants to do. Clean toilets might be dirty work. Maybe your friend is having a party, and there're a lot of people invited, and the party has to be cancelled. Maybe the dirty work is you have to tell everyone the party is cancelled. So it's work you don't want to do. Example No. 3: "get worked up". What does it mean to "get worked up"? It means you get very, very angry or very upset. It means you get very emotional. When you get worked up, you get very angry or emotional. So "get worked up". An example of that: Maybe it's the night before your big test, and you haven't studied, and you're very stressed out, and you start to cry, and you say, "I'm not going to pass this test. My life is ruined. I'll never get into a university. Everything's horrible." That's you getting worked up, okay? Because chances are you will do all right on your test, and you will get into university, and even if you don't, you can try again at a later time. No. 4: "work out". So "work out" has two meanings. The first meaning is "exercise", okay? Do any of you guys work out? I think working out is fun. So it just means, you know, if you like to run, if you like to lift weights. Maybe you like to play basketball -- these are "workouts"; it's exercise to become healthy. The second meaning of "work out" is when you "work something out", you find a solution to that. So for example, maybe you have a math problem, maybe two times two, two times two: You have to "work it out". That one is a little easy, but maybe you have calculus.
3,050 views | Sep 01, 2013
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game | 5 conversation phrasal verbs you need to know

5 conversation phrasal verbs you need to know

http:www.engvid.com These 5 phrasal verbs are used every day by native speakers to help them "catch up" with friends and "work out" problems at home and work. Study this video and you won't ever feel cut off in a conversation. Take a quiz on this lesson here: http:www.engvid.com5-conversation-phrasal-verbsTRANSCRIPTOkay, James. Product placement right about now. Apple Computers, take one. Hi. James from EngVid. Yeah. We're getting sponsored by Apple. "Sponsored" means someone is paying you to do something. No, it's not the case. And just so you know, this is the cheap version that's old. One of you guys made a guess last time I held it up. You're like, "It's the Apple 5 with retinal scan!" I don't even know what that is, so don't ask me. Okay? So -- but Mr. E and I, we get to work on my computer, and we're going to tell a story. Mr. E, ready? Okay. So "Mr. E helped to blank blank my new computer. It's not new. It something something well, and we finished early. However, it something something Mr. E had forgotten to pay his electric bill, so the power was something something -- wow, a lot of 'something somethings'. We sat in the -- excuse me. We sat in the dark" -- stop. The end. This is a stupid story. I'm going to try and do a better story. Mr. E, help me, okay? Now, Mr. E -- first of all, I should tell you what this is about. I'm giving you five phrasal verbs that are commonly used in conversation that will help you have, you know, a more interesting conversation, but not just that. Because these are used commonly in conversation, you can understand what people are saying because I'm going to try and teach you not just one --no sirree Bob! We're having a sale today. James's sale -- you're going to get two for the price of one meaning, so you can understand this story, but when you're done, you can go back and actually build your own stories or usages, okay? So let's go to the beginning."Mr. E helped me to something at my new computer." Well laptops are different. You just put it in a room. In the old days and even now, some people buy big computers, and they have speakers and they have the box and, you know, the big screen. And you have to put it somewhere. Well, when you put it somewhere, you know, you want to arrange or build a system. We call that a "set up". You set it up. It means to put it or arrange it in a way you can use it. You "set up" a business, right? It's a system, you know. You know you buy; you sell -- it's a system. So setting something up is to arrange it or organize it or build a thing that you can use. That's one definition, "set up". What's the second one?" To place somebody in an awkward situation". Interesting. Sometimes you're watching the movies -- I'm sure you watch many of them -- someone will say, "He set me up that so-and-so." Well, what it means is they knew something about the person; they pretended they didn't know; then, they got other people to come around to expose or get the truth out. That's called a "setup". The police "set up" criminals all the time, right? They pretend to buy drugs. They pretend, but they don't actually want to buy them. The criminal sells them, and then they catch them. And they say, "It was a setup from the beginning", and the police go, "Yeah, and you fell for it." When you "fall" for something, you believe it's true even though it's not, okay? So "set up" here means two things: to arrange a system; that's one thing, and that's what we did with my computer system. It's not an awkward situation. We've arranged and built a system, right? So let's set up. Let's go back. Mr. E helped me to set up my new computer. That means we put it on a table, got the speakers, plugged it in, made it work. Cool, right? Next, "It w___ o___ well and we finished early." "W___ o___ well" -- what could that be? W-o, w-o. Well, look. See this other arrow comes down here. What does that mean? Well, it means fix a problem -- or couples fix a relationship -- and come to a successful end. Well, what we're talking about is work because when you have a problem you must work, right? To come to a successful end means you must do some work first to come to the end. Running a race; making dinner; fixing a problem. Fixing a problem requires work. Couples have to work on a relationship. And we also have this "this worked out". And if you're like Arnold Schwarzenegger, you have big muscles because you work out. That's my best Arnold impersonation. Okay, so Arnold works out, but that's different. So we also say -- and I should've put it here -- "go to gym", right? Because a lot of times I hear foreign students say, "Teacher, we go exercising now." And I always go, "[laugh] You go exercise. Right." North Americans, English speakers, they "work out". That's what we do when we go to the gym. It is exercising, but that's our word. Be here we say, "It worked out well".
1,053 views | Oct 11, 2013
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game | English Vocabulary In the bedroom...

English Vocabulary In the bedroom...

http:www.engvid.com Let's go into the bedroom... and learn some new words there! I'm going to teach you lots of bedroom vocabulary: simple words like 'pillow' and strange words like 'duvet'. Don't hit the snooze button! Wake up and learn these words now. http:www.engvid.comenglish-vocabulary-bedroomTRANSCRIPTHello. Welcome to my bedroom. It's not my bedroom. It's a whiteboard with words on it, but I'm going to teach you about bedroom -- vocabulary that is. Stay tuned. Maybe I'll teach you some other bedroom vocabulary if you know what I mean. We're going to go on the innocent side today, and I'm going to teach you about basic things in bedrooms. I know. I know. Okay. This is a bed. Do you sleep on a bed, or do you sleep on a futon? Did I speak Japanese? Hi, Japanese people in the house. Konnichiwa. O-genki desu ka? When you sleep, you usually sleep on a "futon". We have stolen your word. We're so nice. And we use it for our own. "Futon" -- if you know or don't know -- is, basically, a mattress that you put on the floor. It sounds kind of uncomfortable, but it's really, really good if you're really drunk, and there's never a fear of falling out of the bed. You just kind of roll over and, boom, you're awake. It has some advantages and some disadvantages. So this is a picture of a bed. I am an artist. Remember this as we go through this. The first very common thing that you will find in a bedroom is a pillow. "Pillow". A lot of people -- I don't know why -- have never learned this word in English. I know it's not in a lot of textbooks. You don't open your textbook and go, "Wow, this is a pillow." You're more like, "This is a pen." Thanks. I know that. So the first one is a pillow. A "pillow" is a soft or hard, squishy thing that you put your head on -- not that head; this head. And to keep your pillow clean, you're going to put a pillow case on it. A "pillow case" is like a cover for the pillow. You can take the pillow case off, and please wash it. You can have different kinds of pillows. There're feather pillows. So what we do is we take a duck or a goose; we kill it; we take all its feathers off; and we stick them in a pillow. Yeah. I don't think that's really cool. Or you can just have a fluffy cotton pillow or another microfibre pillow. You have a pillow case. The next thing that is essential for a bed -- please -- are sheets. Now be careful with your pronunciation. You don't want to say "shits". That's the stuff that comes out of your bum. You want to say "sheets". When you say this, the "e's" are very long. So you're going to say "sheets". Usually, we have a top sheet and a fitted sheet. The fitted sheet just means it's the bottom sheet. They like to use fancy words like fitted sheet, top sheet -- just two sheets. And you know what? You can use just two of these. Don't worry about it. The top sheet -- it goes on top. And the fitted sheet goes on the bottom. It covers -- the main part of your bed here is a mattress. The "mattress" is, like, a big fluffy thing that you get to relax on. And the black part of my picture would be a bed frame. Let's write that down. It's important. So a "bed frame" is the support of the mattress. Pillow, pillow case, sheets, top and bottom or fitted sheets. Next: In Canada, or maybe in your country, in the winter, it's cold. You want something to cover you. Sheets are very thin. They're usually made of cotton. A "cover" or a "blanket", a "duvet" -- du-what? This word is a French word. So the way that we say it looks very different from the spelling. It looks like "duvette". I think that maybe some people -- especially people in America -- would say, "I got a new duvette cover. It's got some 'dubyas' on it." It's actually very important that you say this properly and you say "duvet". So it's like "du-vay". The next one is a comforter. "Comforter", "duvet", "blanket", "cover", and the last one, a "quilt" -- they're all the same. Don't tell people who like to design beds and fabrics that it's just something that keeps you warm. There are slight differences between a quilt, a comforter, and a duvet, but you can discover that for yourself. You've got homework. Go to a store. Ask the people that work there to show you a quilt, a comforter, a duvet, a blanket, and a cover. You're practicing your English.The next thing that you would have in your bedroom is furniture. "Furniture" is an uncountable noun. "Furniture" includes a bed, a nightstand -- "Ronnie, what's a 'nightstand'?" Oh, "standing up", "nighttime" -- what? No. A nightstand or -- maybe this makes more sense -- a bedside table. Look at my picture. This thing right here is a "bedside table". It's beside your bed, and it's a table. I know. Sometimes English makes sense. "Nightstand" or "bedside table" -- these are the same. Some people say "nightstand"; some people say "bedside table". Some people just say "that thing beside the bed". But it is definitely a bedside table or nightstand.
2,614 views | Aug 09, 2013
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game | Present Perfect or Past Perfect?

Present Perfect or Past Perfect?

http:www.engvid.com "I have eaten." "I had eaten." What's the difference, and when do use each form? In this important grammar lesson, learn how to distinguish between past perfect and present perfect. You'll learn the correct form of each tense, and when each should be used. Then take the quiz at http:www.engvid.compresent-perfect-or-past-perfect .
4,025 views | Apr 09, 2012
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game | 6 Confusing Words fun funny, famous popular, surprise shock

6 Confusing Words fun funny, famous popular, surprise shock

http:www.engvid.com If I go to an amusement park, it is fun or funny? Is George W. Bush famous or popular? Was the dead animal I saw a surprise or a shock? New English speakers often confuse these 3 pairs of words. Learn how they are different! http:www.engvid.com6-confusing-words
1,258 views | Mar 01, 2013
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